New York Mets

Running the Mets’ finances was so much more fun when Bernie Madoff was around to help pay the bills. Read more »

Shortly after their team’s last pennant, Mets owners Fred Wilpon and Saul Katz had what proved to be a prescient idea: In spite of his genius, perhaps they should not entrust every dime they had to Bernie Madoff. You might call this good luck. You might call it only marginally fortunate, since the Mets family saw about 700 million fake dollars disappear one day in December 2008. You might, if you were named Irving Picard, call it indisputable evidence that Wilpon and Katz were in cahoots with the biggest fraudster of all time.

In any event, Wilpon and Katz kicked a few bucks to McKinsey vet Peter Stamos to start a hedge fund, which is more or less the only reason they still have any bucks to not spend on competent baseball players. Now, however, Stamos desires to sow his oats unencumbered by any grandfatherly baseball owners. Or by Bank of America, for that matter, which is fortunate, because Bank of America has bigger things to deal with than its non-voting stake in a $6.6 billion hedge fund. Read more »