Occupy Wall Street

Some people tangentially linked to the movement have figured out what it was all about: getting access to all of those things enjoyed by the 1%, like prepaid debit cards. Read more »


She’ll only be there ’til 4 so interested parties had best get their asses out there ASAP. [Twitter, MH]

Related: Spandex-Clad, Billy-Club Brandishing Roller Girl Also Moonlights As ‘Ethical Fiscal Fairy’; Spandex-Clad Roller Girl Was Not Only Prepared To Put Citi Execs Over Her Knee But Read Them Their Rights; Blow-Up Jamie Dimon Recieved An Ass Kicking Today; Noted ‘Bank Reform Bitch’ Also Makes Appearances As ‘Desperate for Justice Housewife’; Bank Reform Bitch/ Ethical Fiscal Fairy/ Spandex-Clad Roller Girl/ Better Banking Butterfly Weighs In On Derivatives; Bank Reform Bitch/ Spandex-Clad Roller Girl/ Better Banking Butterfly/ Ethical Fiscal Fairy Pays Jamie Dimon A House Call; Confidential To HSBC: Bank Reform Bitch/ Spandex-Clad Roller Girl/ Better Banking Butterfly/ Ethical Fiscal Fairy Is Comin’ At Ya Thursday AM

  • 01 May 2012 at 4:16 PM

Occupy Wall Street Celebrity Is Back

Back in October, we met Stacey Hessler, a woman made famous by the Post because she’d decided to leave her financial adviser husband and four kids in Florida and join Occupy Wall Street protesters camping out in Zuccotti Park. Although Hessler’s family was apparently not happy with her decision, at the time she declared, “I’m not planning on going home…I’m here  indefinitely. Forever.” Forever turned out to be not as long as it sounds and  Hessler, who it was reported made a special friend in “like-minded radicals, including Rami Shamir, 30, a waiter at a French bistro in Cobble Hill” returned to Florida at some point in the last several months (likely when OWS was ejected from the park). Fortunately, she made the trip up for today’s planned activities. Read more »

  • 30 Apr 2012 at 1:27 PM

JPMorgan (Et Al) Sued By Occupy Wall Street

Four New York City Council members sued the city today over the handling of Occupy Wall Street protestors, claiming the police used excessive force and should be subject to an outside monitor. The city and the Police Department made false arrests and violated the free-speech rights of protestors and journalists last year, 15 people including the council members said today in a complaint in Manhattan federal court. JPMorgan Chase, Brookfield Office Properties and Mayor Michael Bloomberg are among the defendants…“Through unlawful exercises of public power and misapplication of law, the NYPD has sought to prevent and has prevented plaintiffs and other citizens from exercising certain constitutional rights, including the right to public assembly and expressive speech,” according to the complaint. [Bloomberg]

Remember Occupy Wall Street? After being evicted from its Zuccotti Park global headquarters in Lower Manhattan last year the group seemed to lose a bit of steam but has vowed a resurgence, starting with a May 1 “spring offensive.” Protests have been planned in 115 cities where “the financial elite play and plan,” including the midtown offices of JPMorgan and Bank of America. Worried your place of business or home might be the target of some uninvited guests and/or a surly gigantic check? Then you might want to get in touch with your fellow prey and start strategizing. Read more »

…if I were in charge I would probably reorganize the movement around a single, achievable goal: a financial boycott of the six “ too big to fail ” Wall Street firms: Bank of America, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Wells Fargo. We would encourage people who had deposits in these firms to withdraw them, and put them in smaller, not “too big to fail” banks. We would stigmatize anyone who invested, in any way, in any of these banks. I’d try to organize college students to protest on campuses. Their first goal would be to force the university endowments to divest themselves of shares in these banks…I think we could create a run on a bank. [TDB]

Last evening at Columbia College Dan Loeb, among others, was given the John Jay Award for Distinguished Professional Achievement. In his speech, the Third Point founder spoke of happy times, like his days at Columbia, spent taking economics classes and reading the texts of Don Quixote, Epictetus, King Lear and Candide, and his nights spent conversing with friends “about girls or dreams or aspirations but often about those very great books or art, which we all internalized and helped for the fabric of who we are today.” He spoke of transformative times, like when fellow Columbia grad John Jay helped get slaves emancipated in New York. And he spoke of dark times, like the ones we’re currently living through. Which, while harrowing, do lend themselves quite nicely to verse. Sayeth Loeb: Read more »