Paulson and Co

John Paulson Doesn’t Need Your Pity

The total value of the properties in Paulson & Co.’s $298.4 million Paulson Real Estate Recovery Fund has roughly doubled on paper since the fund was launched in 2009, an executive said Wednesday at the fund’s annual meeting in New York…The private-equity real-estate fund is primarily invested in raw land, as well as the hotel companies Extended Stay Hotels and CNL Hotels & Resorts Inc. The fund makes up a tiny percentage of the firm’s roughly $19 billion in assets as of August, but has nonetheless been a bright spot in a tough period for Mr. Paulson…amid major subsequent losses at his funds, according to investors, some clients have pulled out. Still, many investors have remained loyal and potential new investors have approached the firm recently about putting in money, looking to invest at a low point, said people familiar with the firm. [WSJ]

Don’t Count Out John Paulson Just Yet

Yes, he’s on track to record another annus fucking horribilis, but he’s still got another 19 trading days to turn this thing around. Anything could happen. Read more »

As Paulson and Co employees, clients, and people named John Paulson do not need to be told, the past year and half has not been the most joyous of times for the hedge fund giant. After making billions shorting subprime mortgages, the firm ended 2011 down 55 percent, was down 16 percent through the first half of 2012, and as of July saw assets under management decline 44.9 percent to $21 billion from $38.1 billion, due to a combination of unfortunate performance and redemptions by investors so angry at the fund that they’ve felt the need to repeatedly tell anyone who will listen that parting ways with P&C was among the best if not the best decision they’ve ever made. One investor that hasn’t had to consider voicing its unhappiness to the press or even worry about losing money at all? The 92nd Street Y. Last November Paulson guaranteed that he would personally cover their losses, whatever they turned out to be, come year-end. And the generosity did not stop there: for this one investor only, Paulson offered his services pro-bono, waiving all fees. So while he probably didn’t expect representatives of the Y to rent a skywriting plane to proclaim their love and appreciation for him over midtown, lobby the city of New York to get 92nd renamed Paulson Street, or have his face tattooed to their chests, he probably also figured they wouldn’t turn around and hit him the mother of all slaps in the face. Read more »

In a pinch, Steve Cohen has made himself a few zip-up fleece jackets with only a travel sewing kit and some Silly Putty at his disposal. Alone in the woods and miles from home, Ray Dalio has been known to fashion slingshots out of the remains of wildebeests. Having blown through all his 100-count packs already and in a race against the clock, George Soros has constructed condoms out of strips of bacon; old tea bags; and British pounds. According to Dealbook, however, today they must all bow down to the master. Read more »

“John Paulson, the billionaire hedge- fund manager coming off record losses in 2011, reported increases in most of his funds in August as rising stock markets lifted the value of holdings, according to two people briefed on the returns. Paulson’s Gold Fund led gains with an 11 percent jump in August, which reduced losses this year to 15 percent, said the people, asking not to be named because the information is private. The Advantage funds, which seek to profit from corporate events such as takeovers and bankruptcies, and Paulson Enhanced, which aims to make money from companies involved in mergers, also rose last month.” [Bloomberg]

Some of the questions focused on Mr. Paulson’s flagship fund’s performance, which he admitted was disappointing, though the tone of the call wasn’t “agitated or aggressive, even though some people were frustrated,” said a person familiar with the discussion. One person asked Mr. Paulson for a timeline of how long it would take to turn things around. He declined to specify a timeline, but said his objective was to win back the losses the fund had suffered. Mr. Paulson said the fund didn’t need a broad market rally. Instead, he noted, some specific investments would need to perform better.  [WSJ, related]

Citigroup’s private bank is pulling about $500 million from Paulson & Co., the hedge fund run by billionaire John Paulson seeking to reverse record losses in 2011, according to two people familiar with the matter. The private bank is redeeming from Paulson’s Advantage Fund and Advantage Plus Fund, said the people who asked not to be identified because the information is private…Citigroup’s private bank in May advised clients not to add money to the Paulson funds, a person familiar with the matter said at the time. [Bloomberg]