Pershing Square

The Pershing Square chief thinks that Fairholme Capital and Perry Capital will win their lawsuits re: the government stealing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from their shareholders and directing every last cent of profit into Jack Lew’s slush fund. And he’s figured out how to make even more money from said victory than they will: It begins with not having to pay lawyers to sue the government and ends with common shares doing better than Fairholme and Perry’s preferred shares. Read more »

Even better than the last time he asked, when the only thing that happened was the opposite of what he wanted, and cost him a large sum of money. Read more »

The proposed order was drafted by Herbalife and Dana Bostick, the former California distributor who is suing the company under the state’s “chain letter,” or pyramid scheme, law. It’s common for parties to come up with protective orders that forbids sharing of confidential information obtained during discovery — but the judge balked when Herbalife went a step further and suggested a “highly confidential, lawyers’ eyes only” category for “high-risk” experts that have had anything to do with Pershing Square since 2010 or might in the next three years. It defined a “Pershing Square person” as “any present or former directors, officers, executives, partners, principals, trustees, employees, agents, attorneys, accountants, advisors and representatives, or any other person(s) known, believed or suspected to be acting or purporting to act on its behalf, now or at any previous time since January 1, 2010, including but not limited to William Ackman and Sullivan & Cromwell LLP.” [NYP]

Pershing Square’s Bill Ackman appeared on Bloomberg Television for an hour today from the Robin Hood Investors Conference in New York, telling Bloomberg TV’s Stephanie Ruhle that he’ll take his Herbalife bet “to the end of the earth” even as he has lost $400-$500 million on the investment. He also said that Herbalife longs are all 80-year old billionaires. Carl Icahn responded to Ackman in a conversation with Bloomberg TV’s Trish Regan, saying: “I fail to understand how Bill Ackman, whom I haven’t spoken to for years, nor do I intend to speak to, would know what I am or am not committed to. I continue to believe Herbalife has a great future, and in my opinion many of the things Ackman says about it are simply the rantings of a sore loser…Interestingly there is something that Ackman and I have in common. Ackman complained at an Oxford conference that every time I went on TV and mentioned Herbalife, the stock went up a few points. Well, that’s also true of him.” Read more »

Pershing Square Did Pretty Okay For Itself Last Month

October performance. Read more »

  • 22 Oct 2013 at 12:37 PM

Caption Contest Tuesday


Bill Ackman taking a Citibike for a spin last week at a Park Avenue Armory gala. [NYSD]

I’ve seen my share of odd moments during annual meetings, but until Thursday I’d never seen a grown man cry during one. O.K., maybe “cry” is a bit of an overstatement for what happened. Still, it was pretty startling when, in the middle of his speech to Target Corporation shareholders, William A. Ackman, the hedge fund manager who had waged an expensive, high-profile proxy fight against the company, suddenly choked up and stopped speaking. He wiped away a tear.Joe Nocera/NYT, May 29, 2009

The group met in a small conference room. Instead of the usual three SEC attorneys, only two were at that meeting. Gerald Russello, the attorney who had been leading the investigation, had taken a job in the general counsel’s office at Bear Stearns. The presentation was going according to plan when [Pershing Square's general counsel] noticed that Ackman was getting agitated. “I’ve shown you this fraud. I’ve shown you that fraud,” Ackman said. “What do I have to do? What do I have to prove to you before you take some action?” His face was flushed, his eyes misty.Christine Richard, Confidence Game, 2010

Without reading any further, [Pershing Square's general counsel] told his wife, “I may have to quit my job tomorrow.” His boss’s habit of writing long, emotional, late-night missives without having him vet them was one of the aggravations of his job. But this was the worst yet.Christine Richard, Confidence Game, 2010

Staring down the activist, the directors proposed installing Ingram as chairman, and chief financial officer Kathryn McQuade as interim CEO. Ackman’s furious outburst could be heard in an outside hallway, where a clutch of advisers was standing by…Half a year later, Ackman is asked to explain his Calgary outburst. “Ballistic is too strong a word,” he says. He searches long and hard for diplomatic words to explain his passionate reaction in the CP boardroom. “There were a lot of bruised feelings,” he says. “It took a while before we were able to work it out. The first few hours were not easy.” When it is suggested that his anger may be a deliberate act to unnerve his adversaries, he is incensed. “I don’t act, ever,” he says. “I’m exactly who I appear to be. I am unfiltered, for better or worse.”Globe and Mail, November 29, 2012

As has been discussed at length in the past, and as you can see from the above, Pershing Square founder Bill Ackman is an investor who wears his heart on his sleeve. A hedge fund manager who imbues emotion in everything he does. Sometimes those emotions come in the form of anger. Sometimes they come out in the form letters penned at 2AM to various SEC officials because what he had to say could not wait another few hours. More often than not, they come out as salty tears that were impossible to hold back.

Ackman’s emotional range has been well-documented and when a reporter recently questioned whether or not said emotions were real or simply a tactic to weird out his opponents, he informed her that what you see is what you get. Bill Ackman fakes nothing and furthermore, doesn’t deem it necessary to hold back when gripped by feelings, whatever they may be: unlike some money managers, whose facial expressions betray fewer hints of what they’re thinking or feeling than a corpse, Bill Ackman is man enough to let it all hang out, a quality that, for the record, we think he should highlight rather than distance himself from.

So it was a bit odd to see him tell Andrew Ross Sorkin this: Read more »