prison

If the previous odds of a considerable stay in jail didn’t deter you before… Read more »

Mathew Martoma, he of the “most lucrative insider-trading scheme in history” Martomas, is going to jail for a while, though for less time than the government wanted. Read more »

  • 05 Sep 2014 at 1:42 PM

Mathew Martoma Is Still Going To Jail

Despite his lawyer’s arguments that 1) The government’s key witness can’t be trusted and 2) That whole business with the fake Harvard Law transcripts made him look bad in the eyes of the jury. Read more »

Remember the group of old high school buddies, who put Colonia High Class of ’88 on the map when they were criminally and civilly prosecuted for an “insider trading scheme focused on pharmaceutical and medical technology stocks”? They’ve all received punishments that range from fines to prison time and that’s in spite of the fact that:

  • The phrase “I have some vacation pictures for you” was a cover for payments made to tippers
  • Deals were referred to in code as the “Fat Man,” while updates on the statuses of deals were communicated with lines like “fat man has a friend” and “fat man walks alone”
  • One of the men assured everyone that even if the Securities and Exchange Commission did catch on, they wouldn’t have the resources to do anything about it. (To wit: “The SEC’s got to pick their battle because they have a limited number of people and huge numbers of investors to go after.”

And yet! Read more »

  • 17 Jun 2014 at 3:23 PM

Civil Penalty Watch ’14: Rajat Gupta

Ex-Goldman Sachs board member Rajat Gupta reported to prison earlier today for, among other things, being unable to wait more than 23 seconds to spill material non-public information to now-known insider trader Raj Rajaratnam. Also, he needs to come up with about $24.9 million, if anyone’s feeling generous. Read more »

Rajat Gupta, the Goldman Sachs director who waited but 23 seconds after a Goldman board meeting to call hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam with material, non-public information, has lost his bid to stay out of jail. Read more »

Five former aides to Bernard Madoff who spent decades working for his firm were found guilty of helping run the biggest Ponzi scheme in U.S. history, a $17.5 billion fraud exposed by the 2008 financial crisis. The three men and two women, hired by Madoff with little financial experience, were convicted on all counts. The defendants failed to persuade a federal jury in Manhattan they were ignorant of the fraud despite being part of the inner circle at his New York-based firm…The defendants are Annette Bongiorno, who ran the investment advisory unit at the center of the fraud; Joann Crupi, who managed large accounts; Daniel Bonventre, the ex-operations chief of Madoff’s broker-dealer; and computer programmers George Perez and Jerome O’Hara, accused of automating the scam as it grew rapidly in the 1990s. [Bloomberg]