prison

  • 01 Feb 2013 at 5:16 PM

The Ballad of Roomy Khan

Life is terribly unfair. You help bring down Raj Rajaratnam and get yelled at by a defense lawyer during another insider-trading trial, but you tell a few white lies, destroy some evidence, warn some of your friends—including the only fugitive in the whole insider-trading crackdown—that the Feds are on to them and perjure yourself a little, and you don’t get to get away with your second insider-trading conviction. Read more »

Option A: shut the hell up. Option B: spend time in prison. Read more »

Timothy S. Durham, the onetime chief executive officer of National Lampoon Inc., was sentenced to 50 years in prison for defrauding investors in an unrelated company he partly controlled. Durham, who was also the CEO of Indianapolis-based buyout firm Obsidian Enterprises Inc., and an accomplice, James Cochran, 57, were convicted in June of taking money raised from Fair Finance investors, spending it on themselves and lending it to other entities they controlled. A third man, Rick Snow, 49, was convicted of helping to deceive investors about the company’s financial condition. The three squandered $208 million of investors’ money, according to U.S. Attorney Joseph Hogsett in Indianapolis [...] “I feel badly about all this,” Durham told Magnus- Stinson. He said he was surprised at the amount of money lost by four victims who also spoke in court today. “I wish I had tried harder to make things clearer for them,” he said of Fair Finance’s public disclosures. [Bloomberg]

Which apparently wasn’t enough. Read more »

Breathe easy, friends of Bob Diamond and the guy who wrote “Anything for you, Big Boy,” as a response to the request, “Can you manipulate Libor for me today when you’ve got a sec? Thanks a mill.” In this case we speak of Rachael Claire Martin, the ex-Barlcays employee who used customer funds to pay for breast augmentations, dental work, liposuction, drugs, alcohol, shoes, and jewelry, despite initially telling authorities she covered the tricks and treats with money she earned engaging in sex for payment (an excuse anyone else facing questioning for their own alleged misconduct should feel free to test out). Read more »

Remember Bradley Birkenfeld? He’s the guy who single-handedly made the government’s case against UBS and forced the Swiss bank to hand over the names of thousands of tax cheats, which resulted in the US scoring $780 million from UBS and may have inspired some 33,000 Americans to “voluntarily disclose offshore accounts to the IRS, generating more than $5 billion.” And yet, despite his assistance, Birkenfeld wasn’t immediately thanked for a job well done. Instead, he was sentenced to forty months in prison (fair-ish, considering he showed a few clients how to avoid paying taxes himself) and told to piss off by the Internal Revenue Service, from whom he sought an award, because he was “not forthcoming about his own role in the scheme,” even as a Justice Department attorney admitted that “…without Mr. Birkenfeld walking into the door of the Department of Justice in the summer of 2007, I doubt as of today that this massive fraud would have been discovered by the US government” (or as his lawyer put it, “They didn’t know how to spell UBS until he showed up. He didn’t just give them a piece of the puzzle. He gave them the entire puzzle”). Now, after doing 32 months at Schuylkill Federal Correctional Institution, getting let out early on account of “good-time credit,” and living in a halfway house in New Hampshire, Birkenfeld has finally been thrown a bone. Read more »

  • 17 Jul 2012 at 11:48 AM

Former Barclays Employee Is Probably Going To Jail

Before anyone takes to Twitter to give the UK a piece of her mind, though, breathe easy: the misconduct is related to funds used to pay for breast augmentations and other cosmetic enhancements and could even take some of the heat off of Bob Diamond et al, who’ve yet* to be accused of using customer money to finance their liposuction. Read more »