SAC Capital alums

According to Dealbook, the government wants 8+. As previously discussed, Martoma and his lawyers do not want a sentence even approaching that length of time, and have so far put forth the argument that it should be a lot fewer years because the ex-trader employee was only responsible for $49 million out of the $276 million SAC Capital made based on inside information about Elan and Wyeth. Read more »

So far the defense team has only one (Martoma was only responsible for $49 million out of the $276 million SAC Capital made based on inside information about Elan and Wyeth) but by late July? Hoo-boy, you just wait. It’ll be a regular BuzzFeed article up in that courtroom (20 Reasons Why Mathew Martoma Should Serve Far Fewer Years Than The Government’s Recommended Sentence). Read more »

The sentencing of former SAC Capital Advisors LP hedge fund manager Mathew Martoma, who faces what may be the longest insider trading prison-term in history, will be delayed following a defense request for additional time, a court clerk said. Martoma, 40, was convicted in February in what prosecutors have called the biggest insider trading scheme ever by an individual. He could face almost 20 years in prison for trading on illegal tips about an Alzheimer’s drug made by Elan Corp. and Wyeth LLC that gained SAC $276 million and earned him a $9.3 million bonus. Martoma’s lawyers requested in a letter to U.S. District Judge Paul Gardephe last week that the June 10 sentencing be postponed for more than a month, citing a late report by the court’s Probation Department. [Bloomberg]

To be fair, we don’t actually know 1) how much money was raised and 2) if his friend needed a heart. It could’ve been a kidney or liver or a lung. What we do know is that U.S. District Judge Richard Sullivan was somehow unmoved by this argument, made on behalf of ex-SAC employee and convicted insider trader Mike Steinberg: Read more »

Michael Steinberg, a portfolio manager at Steven A. Cohen’s SAC Capital Advisors who was found guilty last year on insider trading charges, has asked for a two-year sentence, far shorter than the term recommended by probation officials. In a 65-page sentencing memo, Steinberg’s lawyer Barry Berke referred to his “character and broader life accomplishments” in arguing that his sentence should be only two years in prison. A report by the court’s probation department recommended that Steinberg be sentenced to a prison term of 4-1/4 to 5-1/4 years for his December conviction on one count of conspiracy to commit securities fraud and four counts of securities fraud. “Mr. Steinberg is a man of many admirable individual characteristics — but more than that, he is a giver and a doer, someone whose contributions to the happiness, success and well-being of his family, friends, and many others are second to none,” Berke wrote to U.S. District Judge Richard Sullivan. [Reuters]

Did the revelation that Martoma, who at the time went by the surname Thomas, created fake transcripts and sent them to judges with whom he was seeking clerkships and then tried to pass the whole thing off as a joke that he blamed on his brother, make Martoma/Thomas look bad? You bet. Did the jury nevertheless find him guilty strictly based on the evidence that he convinced a little old man to give him confidential drug trial results and broke a host of securities laws on the way to orchestrating the most lucrative insider trading scheme ever? That’s what people who did graduate from law school are going with: Read more »

Back in February, a young man named Mathew Martoma (né Ajai Mathew Thomas) was convicted of securities fraud. In addition to the actual act of using material non-public information about drug companies Elan and Wyeth to help out his employer, SAC Capital, in the P&L department, one thing that did not do wonders for Martoma’s case was the revelation that he had been expelled from Harvard Law School in 1999, as even he will tell you. For everything that Martoma is (a white collar criminal, an accomplished dancer), one thing he isn’t is stupid. That’s why when he was applying to Stanford University’s business school in 2001, he opted not to mention the incident at Harvard, probably figuring it would hurt his chances. One thing Martoma did not have the foresight to anticipate was that he would one day be a convicted felon, and, more importantly, that when it comes down to it? NOBODY MAKES A FOOL OF STANFORD. Which is this just happened:

Mathew Martoma, the SAC Capital Advisors LP employee found guilty last month of insider trading, is no longer a graduate of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, the school confirmed Tuesday. Administrators at the business school rescinded their offer of admission to Mr. Martoma, a move that nullifies the degree he earned in 2003, according to people familiar with the matter.

Of course, the university is not totally heartless: it gave Martoma a chance to explain, but evidently 4 weeks is not enough time to come up with a credible story. Read more »