SAT’s

In 1984, when he was a junior at Horace Greeley High School, in affluent Chappaqua, New York, he wagered his father $2,000 that he would score a perfect 800 on the verbal section of the S.A.T. The gamble was everything Ackman had saved up from his Bar Mitzvah gift money and his allowance for doing household chores. “I was a little bit of a cocky kid,” he admits, with uncharacteristic understatement. Tall, athletic, handsome with cerulean eyes, he was the kind of hyper-ambitious kid other kids loved to hate and just the type to make a big wager with no margin for error. But on the night before the S.A.T., his father took pity on him and canceled the bet. “I would’ve lost it,” Ackman concedes. He got a 780 on the verbal and a 750 on the math. “One wrong on the verbal, three wrong on the math,” he muses. “I’m still convinced some of the questions were wrong.” [Vanity Fair]

Seven Long Island, New York, students were charged with taking part in a scheme in which six of them paid the seventh to take the SAT college-admissions test on their behalf, prosecutors said. Six current or former students at Great Neck North High School, about 20 miles east of Manhattan, are accused of paying Samuel Eshaghoff, 19, of Great Neck, to impersonate them so they could get higher scores on the test, Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen M. Rice said in a statement. Eshaghoff, a 2010 Great Neck North graduate, now attends Emory University in Atlanta after spending his freshman year at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Rice’s office said. He was paid $1,500 to $2,000 for each test, and took the exam for free for a female student. [Bloomberg]