SEC

  • 11 Aug 2014 at 6:24 PM
  • Banks

Legal Reserve Watch ’14: JPMorgan Chase

Jamie Dimon may have to squirrel away a few extra dollars, as the SEC and OCC team up to see whether JPMC was a little bit too proud of some of its world-class investment funds. Read more »

Last week, Judge Shira Scheindlin made pretty clear that she doesn’t think it is reasonable to ascribe 13 years of stock appreciation to a couple of elderly men’s scheme to hide their trading in said stock, even if they were on the board of said stock’s company and even if a jury found them to be very bad men, indeed. So the SEC went back to the drawing board and is now willing to settle for half of it. No word as to whether it offered a “credible explanation” for the new math. Read more »

FINRA has had an awful lot dumped onto its plate in recent months. Since, as it turns out, its members aren’t the best at reporting little things like criminal convictions, personal bankruptcies, tax liens, etc., to the self-regulator, it’s had to order member firms to do some background checks themselves, rather than just take the word of the new guy who’s joining his 34th brokerage in eight years. Worse still, it’s had to tell those member firms to give it all of the information, which it had promised to go through with a fine toothed-comb and check against court records to minimize the number of paroled felons doling out financial advice under its august banner.

Well, if the highly-compensated folks at FINRA thought they might be able to deal with the ensuing backlog with their old delete-red-flags-from-BrokerCheck strategy, it is sorely mistaken. Read more »

  • 26 Jun 2014 at 12:44 PM

Mary Jo White’s Leniency Only For The Pure Of Heart

If you aren’t going to be sincere when confessing all of your employees’ sins to the SEC, don’t bother: Mary Jo White can tell, and it will just make her angrier. Read more »

On Monday, Paradigm Capital Management became the first investment fund to pay a fine for retaliating against an employee who reported his firm’s misdeeds to the S.E.C. The hedge fund, which is based in Albany, N.Y., and manages $1.5 billion of client money, agreed to pay $2.2 million to settle the civil charges…Mr. Nordgaard was head trader at Paradigm Capital from 2009 to August 2012, when his contract was terminated. Mr. Nordgaard, who filed a lawsuit against the firm in 2012, said that shortly after he told his employer that he had reported trading violations, Paradigm Capital “embarked on a campaign of retaliation” against him. Days later, Mr. Nordgaard was removed from his desk and stripped of his trading privileges, according to the lawsuit. He was then assigned to “an isolated location to do low-level compliance work”. [Dealbook]

Having already put the mysterious, opaque platforms on notice, Mary Jo White & Co. are beginning to undress them. One’s already in the soup for taking a little too much pride in the folks it was quietly and very untransparently trading for. The rest are now having some light shone upon the disclosures they’re supposed to be making but maybe aren’t. Read more »

After a high-profile setback involving a certain outspoken NBA owner (not that one), the SEC thought it had figured out how to get a jury to see things its way. Did one not just find that a Texas septuagenarian was every bit the conniving fraudster that the SEC said he was?

Well, Mary Jo White & co.’s winning streak did not last long, so they’re doing what it takes to prevent the start of another losing streak. Read more »