so unfair

Justin Bieber definitely makes a bunch in the bank, but he doesn’t seem to know so much about banking. When the teenybopper star and his crew hit Susan Sarandon’s ping-pong club SPiN Wednesday, they were directed to a private room away from the masses, but told they’d have to give up the space at 6:30 p.m. for a private party. When the time came, a spy says, a SPiN staffer popped into Bieber’s VIP room to tell him it was time to go. The singer’s posse didn’t want to leave and started to kick up a fuss, but they were told, “We’re really sorry, the room is booked . . . J.P. Morgan is having a private party.” Our spy says Bieber then piped up and shot back, “Why does he get the room and not us?” [NYP via Tracy Alloway, related]

  • 02 Dec 2011 at 4:19 PM

A Serious Question

Why does Southern Connecticut get everything? Why does it get to lay claim to all that is great in this world? A short-list includes Steve Cohen’s Cummings Point Pleasure Dome, a guy who’ll park his car on your roof, a group of asset managers who will be more than happy to do whatever you ask, be it bury a hooker you killed or claim your lotto winnings, Cliff Asness’s doll collection, The Largest Trading Floor In The WorldTM, the No. 1 Candy Theft Prevention Team in the U.S., the Great Toilet War of ’08, Paul Tudor Jones’ Christmas Spectacular, Heights and Lights (“a 20-year Stamford tradition that features an acrobatic Santa Claus rappelling down the side of of a building on his way to a local tree lighting”) and now this? Read more »

Three weeks ago, Egan-Jones Ratings Co. downgraded America. Almost no one paid attention. “S&P’s downgrade was on the front page of every newspaper,” said Sean Egan, president of the Haverford, Pa., ratings firm, which has been issuing ratings since 1995. Mr. Egan’s disappointment that Standard & Poor’s rattled the world with its Friday-night rating cut on long-term U.S. government debt to double-A-plus, from triple-A, while his identical move was essentially ignored, is a sign of the grip on the debt-ratings industry held by its three giants. [WSJ, earlier]