status symbols

Time was, signifiers of wealth in the Hamptons were fairly obvious: an address on Further Lane; a place to land a chopper; a casual ease when buying $30,000 bottles of Dom Pérignon at the Pink Elephant; a checking account balance of $100 million; enough money to hate-buy (and bulldoze) a $50 million house. Now? It’s getting into Club Adopt A Higway, where the line is out the door and a Black Card will only get you so far. Read more »

How does one know when they’ve made it in Connecticut? Is it when their net worth is north of $5 billion? Is it when news of their impending arrival downtown causes workers to roll out the fleece carpet? Is it when the Radio City Christmas Spectacular becomes known as the poor man’s version of the holiday light display on their front lawn? Is it when they can finger a horse and no one says anything? None of the above, peasants. One knows they’ve made it in Connecticut when they can board the Metro North train without having to walk 12 miles to the platform in the morning and the same amount back after getting bombed on the way home at night.

In the Metro-North parking lots along Connecticut’s Gold Coast, the haves and the have-nots aren’t defined by their clothes, car or even their net worth. Here, it’s about whether they have a flimsy green piece of paper visible on their dashboards. A public parking pass in this and other towns along the Long Island Sound has become a precious asset. The waiting list for a Fairfield Parking Authority permit has 4,200 people and stretches past six years. In another town, Rowayton, the annual permit sale is an epic frenzy similar to that surrounding the release of a new iPhone, with residents camping out overnight to ensure they get a $325 pass.

Think it’s no big D? Think again. Most people would sell their first born into White slavery for one of these elusive bad boys. Read more »

Not saying, LLOYD, just saying LLOYD– it’s parked outside bankruptcy court at 40 Broadway circa now. Just putting it out there. Read more »