suggestions

Jim CramerFrom May 1999 to December 2013, you have extracted more than $14 million in cash payouts from TST, excluding millions more paid out as stock options. In addition, you have enjoyed considerable non-pecuniary compensation such as perfumed sedan driver(s) and assorted assistants who spray ionized lavender water on your barren cranium. Despite the long decline of TST’s share price your compensation continues to trend higher. The four year employment agreement you signed in November 2013 guarantees you total compensation of at least $3.5 million per annum – nearly 5% of the market capitalization of TST and more than the cumulative dividends expected to be paid out this year to common shareholders…Your brand is, and remains, tremendous. I commend you for your tenacity and intellect, but you are simultaneously an employee of CNBC and a director, major shareholder and employee of TST. To which entity do you ascribe your greater allegiance? There would appear to be a grand structural conflict. You are 59. When you lie upon your deathbed, how will you reflect upon on your legacy? Once a $70 stock, TST is now $2.20. You have done well, but how has the common shareholder done? [SEC via TalkingBizNews]

  • 30 Oct 2014 at 4:30 PM
  • Banks

Deutsche Bank, Suspended Traders Are Friends Again

Alright, you can come down now.When a German judge tells you in clipped tones that you do not want her weighing in on the matter of (a) your suspension for (allegedly!) trying to manipulate interest rates or (b) your suspending said alleged manipulators without actually following any of the (probably thousands of) rules in Germany regarding such, you listen. Deutsche Bank and its suspended traders have listened. Read more »

Just kidding, he actually thinks the entire operation is a joke and went on CNBC to say as much, where he noted that the only conceivable way he could see the company turning things around would be if literally everyone working for it was fired. Read more »

Failure to “adhere to a clear breadstick policy” is one of the many, many things Olive Garden is doing wrong, according to a new presentation by Starboard Value. Read more »

As those of you who follow the news out of Newport Beach, California know, the past couple months have not been the best for Bill Gross. First, Pimco co-CEO Mohammed El-Erian announced that he would be parting ways with the bond giant. Then, the Wall Street Journal detailed his “What the fuck are you looking at” management style, in an article that also revealed Gross’s nickname for himself: Secretariat. Next, Reuters refused to print his theory that El-Erian had penned the Journal story himself, and instead made him not look great by quoting him as saying that El-Erian was waging a campaign to undermine him and that ME-E had Reuterswrapped around his charming right finger.” Along the way, people have offered up suggestions re: how you solve a problem like Bill Gross, which have included not investing with him, slashing his $200 million/year salary, teaching him remedial strategies for acting like a sentient human being who would not admonish someone for daring to look him in the eye and, most recently, putting him out to pasture. Read more »


Have you been indicted for insider trading? Forced to work your protected weekend? Been fired for being too good looking? Don’t waste your time with some fancy white shoe law firm representation. Instead, do yourself a favor and give this guy a call. Read more »

  • 03 Dec 2013 at 4:01 PM

Charlie Gasparino Has An Idea

As the world’s foremost business and economics reporter, everyone expects Gasparino to attend the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The only problem is, he doesn’t like Swiss food, he doesn’t speak German, and, most importantly, skiing is no substitute for brutalizing ones’ pecs in the weight room. For these reasons, CG is a no go. Now, if you’d host the WEF in a more congenial location–a cigar bar, perhaps, or at a boxing match–you might pique his interest. Hold it at a classy Italian restaurant on East 54th Street and, well, let’s just say you can pencil him in. Read more »

Bankers’ bonuses should be deferred for as long as 10 years to hold executives accountable for risks, said Robert Jenkins, a member of a Bank of England committee charged with ensuring financial stability. “Five years might or might not be appropriate for some categories of risk, but if we are going to rely on remuneration as a key driver of financial stability then it should probably be between five or ten years,” Jenkins said in an interview yesterday in Washington. “Ten years would capture the majority of risk cycles and therefore the gains and losses that came from any risk that was taken today.” [Bloomberg, related-ish]