tax evasion

Apparently yesterday’s statement before a Senate subcommittee–wherein Dougan said that neither he nor Credit Suisse executives knew tax evasion was going on, but would nevertheless take responsibility for the few bad apples that had to ruin things for the rest of the group– was not satisfactory, particularly the part where Dougan claimed to just to have no knowledge of the practice. In order to move forward, the group needs to hear Dougan 1. Apologize for the original apology and 2. Say he knew it was going on the whole time, that he weighed in on the best way to hide assets, and maybe offer up pictures of himself on the beach thumbing through a copy of the Credit Suisse Tax Evasion handbook and sipping a pina colada. Follow through on one and two, and all will be forgiven. Read more »

“Some Swiss-based private bankers went to great lengths to disguise their bad conduct from Credit Suisse executive management,” Dougan said at a Senate subcommittee hearing in Washington today. “While that employee misconduct violated our policies, and was unknown to our executive management, we accept responsibility for and deeply regret these employees’ actions.” [Bloomberg]

Group AG Chief Executive Brady Dougan is scheduled to testify Wednesday at a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing on offshore tax evasion, a move that comes as the Swiss bank seeks to settle allegations it helped Americans evade their obligations. According to a witness list made public on Monday, Robert Shafir and Hans-Ulrich Meister, who jointly run Credit Suisse’s private banking and wealth management division, as well as Romeo Cerutti, the bank’s general counsel, will join Mr. Dougan at the hearing. A separate panel will include Kathryn Keneally, U.S. assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s tax division. The hearing will focus on “efforts to hold Swiss banks and their U.S. clients accountable for unpaid taxes on billions of dollars in hidden assets,” according to a press release from the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, which is conducting the hearing. [WSJ]

The whole Swiss bank account thing is but an “isolated incident.” Read more »

Raoul Weil, the former head of UBS AG’s global wealth management business accused of conspiring to help Americans evade taxes, was ordered to post bail of $10.5 million before trial, according to a court filing. Weil, 54, appeared today in federal court in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, for the first time since he was indicted in October 2008 and declared a fugitive. U.S. Magistrate Judge Patrick Hunt said Weil must post a $9 million personal surety bond with a cash deposit of $4 million, as well as a $1 million corporate surety bond and a $500,000 personal surety bond, according to minutes of the hearing. Weil’s lawyer has said he is innocent. He is the highest-ranking banker among about 100 people charged since 2008 by the U.S. in a crackdown on offshore tax evasion. About three dozen foreign bankers, lawyers and advisers were charged. Tax lawyers not involved in the case said they expect Weil to plead guilty, cooperate with prosecutors, and seek leniency at sentencing. “There’s a good chance he’ll be ready to cooperate, and he’ll be throwing his people under the bus,” said attorney Edward Robbins of Hochman, Salkin, Rettig, Toscher & Perez in Beverly Hills, California. “He knows where all the dead bodies are. To the extent that the government missed any, he can tell them where they are.” [Bloomberg]

Maybe they will and maybe they won’t. They’re still weighing the risk/reward and YOU’LL JUST HAVE TO WAIT AND SEE. Read more »

  • 18 Oct 2013 at 5:46 PM
  • Banks

Swiss Bank Curses America For Making Tax-Evasion Unprofitable

Make that former Swiss bank: Bank Frey & Co., whose former private-banking chief has been indicted, just can’t make ends meet anymore under all the scrutiny. Read more »