tax evasion

Several Swiss banks have threatened to freeze American clients’ accounts unless they prove they are, or take steps to become, tax compliant, as the country’s lenders hurry to resolve a tax evasion dispute with the US. The moves – made by a number of banks, according to three people familiar with the situation who did not disclose the identity of the banks involved – come before a deadline at the end of July for banks in a programme set up by the US Department of Justice last year to show which American clients conform to US tax requirements. However, the validity of the banks’ approach has split legal experts. [FT]

In case it was unclear already. Read more »

  • 28 May 2014 at 10:30 AM

U.S. Tax Authorities Have Skied Enough

The Justice Department’s tax-cheat division is ready for some fun in the sun. Read more »

In related news, the bank is about to plead guilty to helping a whole lot of people avoid paying taxes and fork over $2.5 billion1 to the U.S. government. So, it’s a big day for the Swiss. Read more »

Apparently yesterday’s statement before a Senate subcommittee–wherein Dougan said that neither he nor Credit Suisse executives knew tax evasion was going on, but would nevertheless take responsibility for the few bad apples that had to ruin things for the rest of the group– was not satisfactory, particularly the part where Dougan claimed to just to have no knowledge of the practice. In order to move forward, the group needs to hear Dougan 1. Apologize for the original apology and 2. Say he knew it was going on the whole time, that he weighed in on the best way to hide assets, and maybe offer up pictures of himself on the beach thumbing through a copy of the Credit Suisse Tax Evasion handbook and sipping a pina colada. Follow through on one and two, and all will be forgiven. Read more »

“Some Swiss-based private bankers went to great lengths to disguise their bad conduct from Credit Suisse executive management,” Dougan said at a Senate subcommittee hearing in Washington today. “While that employee misconduct violated our policies, and was unknown to our executive management, we accept responsibility for and deeply regret these employees’ actions.” [Bloomberg]

Group AG Chief Executive Brady Dougan is scheduled to testify Wednesday at a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing on offshore tax evasion, a move that comes as the Swiss bank seeks to settle allegations it helped Americans evade their obligations. According to a witness list made public on Monday, Robert Shafir and Hans-Ulrich Meister, who jointly run Credit Suisse’s private banking and wealth management division, as well as Romeo Cerutti, the bank’s general counsel, will join Mr. Dougan at the hearing. A separate panel will include Kathryn Keneally, U.S. assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s tax division. The hearing will focus on “efforts to hold Swiss banks and their U.S. clients accountable for unpaid taxes on billions of dollars in hidden assets,” according to a press release from the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, which is conducting the hearing. [WSJ]