tech

The object of the game (“Kim Kardashian: Hollywood”) is to get rich and famous and involves an animated Kim saying things like “You’re a natural in front of the camera” for a successful photo-shoot and telling you you suck for not hitting on someone’s animated boyfriend. We live in a world in which Morgan Stanley economists think a two-letter app is genius and guys in Silicon Valley pour hundreds of millions into one-letter apps, so, really, sky’s the limit. [Fashionista]

“…the more I think about it, the more I like the ‘yo’ concept. And it’s not because of the app’s latest feature: you can send a ‘yo’ to the username ‘worldcup’ to receive a ‘yo’ (and nothing else) anytime a team scores a goal. Rather, it’s because I’ve always thought that there is beauty in simplicity. I’m a minimalist. I like to sit in my scarcely furnished study with white-washed walls while I write this comment. I hate Christmas decorations. When on a vacation, I like to sit on the shore and stare at the sea in the summer, or climb up a cold, white mountain silently on skis in the winter. I loved to read the late Barton Biggs’s simple but beautiful prose about investing. Life is full of complexity –family, friends, work, politics, financial markets, the global economy. Coping with complexity requires filtering, sorting, reduction, concentration and, at least sometimes, simplification. Sometimes, a simple ‘yo’ can say and mean more to your ‘contacts’ than all the babble.” [BI, earlier]

  • 18 Jun 2014 at 5:25 PM

More To Yo Than That Meets The Eye: CEO

The app, called Yo, lets people say “Yo” to their friends. Tap a name on the app’s list of contacts, and a text notification saying “Yo” pops up on the recipient’s smartphone, along with a recorded voice shouting the syllable. The idea is simple. It may turn out to be a dud. But $1 million has already been staked on its success. Or Arbel, the chief executive of Yo, said on Wednesday that he had raised that seven-figure sum from a group of angel investors led by Moshe Hogeg, the chief executive of an image-sharing app called Mobli. Yo has so much potential, Mr. Arbel said, that last week he left his job as the chief technology officer of Stox, a stock trading platform he helped start last year, and moved to San Francisco from Tel Aviv to work on Yo full-time. “People think it’s just an app that says ‘Yo.’ But it’s really not,” Mr. Arbel said. “We like to call it context-based messaging. You understand by the context what is being said.” [Dealbook]