Thomas Griesa

It is apparently inconceivable to the Argentine political mind that there are things that a presidente cannot do, and so another senior member of Cristina Kirchner’s government has asked Barack Obama to dig around in his secret bag of executive tricks and rid them of that meddlesome magistrate, U.S. District Judge Thomas Griesa. Read more »

  • 08 Aug 2014 at 2:30 PM

Judge Tells Argentina To Say It To His Face

Argentina has been pretty chatty since it defaulted rather than pay Paul Singer last week. Of course, the uniquely recalcitrant debtor insists that it has not defaulted. But it has also lobbed a few bombs in the direction of the judge overseeing its case, the mediator he appointed and the President of the United States, calling the first biased, the second incompetent and the third a pussy for not just making U.S. District Judge Thomas Griesa be nice to it.

Well, Griesa would like to have a little chat about those things, as well as Argentina’s continued badgering of the Bank of New York Mellon to just go ahead and ignore the old man, and probably its publicity-stunt of a lawsuit against the U.S. of A. in the International Court of Justice. Read more »

That way, the next time the Argentine economy minister/negotiator extraordinaire gets huffy about why Barack Obama doesn’t just fire U.S. District Judge Thomas Griesa, or take a page from a previous Argentine regime and make him disappear or something, he can just look “separation of powers” up in the index and turn to the relevant page. We recommend dog-earing it. Read more »

Argentina doesn’t want it back, and the bank would rather not be (a) held in contempt of court or (b) sued by the people who Argentina says the money now belongs to. So it’s going to ask the judge who put it in this situation to expand on his rather glib suggestion that “the money should be returned to the republic, simple as that.” Read more »

  • 30 Jun 2014 at 5:22 PM

(Technical) Default Watch ’14: Argentina

Today’s the big day for the uniquely recalcitrant debtor’s second big D in 13 years, now that its least favorite jurist has reiterated once again that, its best efforts not withstanding, it isn’t allowed to pay only the creditors it wants to pay while piously promising to “meet its obligations, pay off its debts and honor its commitments,” except maybe to these vulture usurers “trying to bring us down to our knees.” Well, maybe not the big day, since failure to pay today—and U.S. District Judge Thomas Griesa made very clear that the “illegal” payment “will not be made,” or he’s gonna start holding people in contempt—amounts to a mere “technical” or “selective” default for 30 days. Then, maybe Moody’s will do something about it. Read more »