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  • 04 Aug 2014 at 12:02 PM

Donald Trump Now Offering Legal Advice To Barclays

Back in July, Barclays was hit with a major lawsuit by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who alleged the bank “favored high-frequency traders in its dark pool and then lied to clients about their participation in the trading venue.” It wasn’t a great look for the Brits and it came at an especially awkward time for chief executive officer Antony Jenkins, who was supposed to be making the place less fraud friendly than it was under his predecessor. And while the bank has its own lawyers on payroll, who have already responded to the charges, one guy who knows from lawsuits has chosen to offer his unsolicited counsel nevertheless. Read more »

Recording the quotidian details of my day seems to add hours a day to my life: I’m not sure why. Another trick is to focus on some ordinary thing–the faintly geological strata of the insides of a burrito, for instance–and try to describe what I see. Another: pick a task I’d normally do quickly and thoughtlessly–writing words for the side of a cup, say– and do it as slowly as possible. Forcing my life into slow-motion, I notice a lot that I miss at game speed. The one thing I don’t notice is the passage of time. [BI]

Researchers from Harvard Business School, Wharton, and the MIT Sloan School of Management have determined that venture capitalists like their pitches wrapped up in pretty packaging. If you’ve got a great idea but sense you’re not Adonis, consider hiring a male model to do the talking. Also of note, don’t even think about letting a woman make your presentation. Read more »

“I admire the move by the European Union to restrict the bonuses of that class of privileged civil servants called “bankers” — a recognition that the taxpayers have the right to control the income of those they subsidize and bail out, just as they set the salaries of other state-sponsored workers. Alas, bankers in their current status are an offense to capitalism; they are in a strange situation of having upside without downside, no skin in the game. As an additional insult to the taxpayer, bankers paid themselves the largest bonus pool of their history in 2010 — thanks to Troubled Asset Relief Program. If a banker wants to be free in his income, he should start his own hedge fund. Because hedge fund operators are invested in their funds; they typically have 50 times more risk as a share of their net worth than their largest customer.” [NYT]


[via @joecheckler]

Fitness, like its closest cousin, athletics, always comes with an undercurrent of competition. That’s beneficial when you’re training for a marathon or trying to lose weight. But most of us are already striving to outperform our colleagues on a daily basis. Adding more rivalry—Bob is the best spinner, Kate fell off the Tough Mudder wall, John is so damn slow—is unnecessary at best and destructive at worst. You’re better off pretending the invite went to your spam folder or ducking out of work early when everyone’s putting on their short-shorts. If you see co-workers at your gym, switch gyms. If you can’t do that, nod from afar. Don’t engage, even positively, as it just gets weird: “Once, I said to my co-worker, ‘I want to have abs like yours,’ ” remembers David Perez, who works in public relations. “It did not go over well.” The biggest issue isn’t the workout itself, it’s what happens after. “I once ran into my boss in the showers, totally naked, and he wanted some exercise advice from me,” says Kivanc Ozdemir, a hotel executive. He told his manager that he should try more cardio. “Obviously, I saw him differently after that.” [BW]

“Drugs and personal excess will always be found on Wall Street (and in any profession that pays big bucks), but it’s been my experience that fraudsters are more often family men like Bernie Madoff — guys who methodically steal tens of billions without screwing a single hooker or snorting a single line of coke.” [NYP]

Bernard Madoff’s former computer programmers asked for payment in diamonds to continue aiding the con man’s $17 billion Ponzi scheme in 2006 after they became uncomfortable with their role, a jury was told. The “crazy” request from Jerome O’Hara and George Perez was turned down and the men were given salary increases and bonuses, Frank DiPascali, Madoff’s former finance chief, testified today in Manhattan federal court in the trial of the men and three other ex-colleagues. “Where the hell am I gonna get a bag of diamonds?” said DiPascali, who pleaded guilty in the case and is testifying in a bid for a lighter sentence. The programmers, who said they were “in a bit of a pickle,” agreed on a “fairly substantial percentage increase” to their salaries, he said. [Bloomberg]