tips

“You’re a farmer. You can’t control the weather. When you make a Brunello, you have to follow a set of rules. One is no interference with nature. You can’t irrigate in a dry year. I happen to like traditional methods. I’m kind of old school. If you’re someone who balks at following rules, you can still make wine, but you can’t call it a Brunello. You might want a vineyard in Napa Valley instead.” [BusinessWeek]

One banker, who used to work at Goldman Sachs and now runs his own business, said he gets his wife to iron his shirts nowadays. “At Goldman there was a service in the basement where I dropped my shirts off for a fee, but now I ask Jane to do it for me,” he said. “The wife is doing the ironing,” another banker told us. “She’s not loving it, but she doesn’t want to get a job herself so is having to accept it.” [eFinancial]

A person in need of a little guidance could seek advice from Prince Alwaleed bin Talal on any number of topics. Interior design (decorate with an emphasis on clean lines and pictures of yourself, ensuring fellow royalty never forget whose office they are in). Business (keep your employees movitvated with occasional hookah parties and pet falcons). Fashion (don’t be caught dead clashing with your horse). Know-nothing list-makers whose inability to add gives the world the impression you’re some kind of street urchin worth a mere $18 billion (TAKE NO PRISONERS). But the area of expertise closest to his heart? Diet and fitness. The formerly plump prince has loads of wisdom to impart on how to get fit and and stay that way. Herewith, a preview of the tips you’ll find in what we hope will be be a forthcoming series of books and DVDs entitled The Alwaleed Lifestyle. Read more »

Sixty-percent of the time it works every time. Read more »

“I wonder where Charlie Gasparino does his grocery shopping” is a question many people have surely asked themselves on many occasions  Lucky for them, today finally brings an answer. The Fox Business reporter was interviewed by “Bronx Times” about his very early boyhood days in the borough, which apparently made a lasting impression on him, despite having moved to Westchester when he was six.

“[The Bronx] was my home away from home basically when I was a kid, up until I was twenty and then I went away to graduate school,” Gasparino says. “My wife is from Brooklyn, but I used to tell her instead of going out to Brooklyn, there are some great restaurants right here and we started going back. Even rather than going to Arthur Avenue I used to go to Throggs Neck. The places I’ve been shopping – I mean Pastosa Ravioli has been there since 1980 – are the easiest three places to shop for really good food: Pastosas, that meat market, Ritchie’s, and that fruit and vegetable store and you get everything you need. And I still do it once a week. If he had to dream up the perfect meal, Gasparino said it would all come from Throggs Neck.

In addition to dropping food-related wisdom, elsewhere in the article CG discusses what his time in the Bronx taught him about life (“you understand…economics plays a role in the way people act”) and offers advice to aspiring journalists (“get literate”). One thing he doesn’t mention? Read more »

  • 21 Dec 2012 at 12:47 PM

Don’t Bury Your Ingots Before Ragnarok

Convinced the impending Western economic collapse (or today’s end of civilization) will plunge the financial centers of North America and Europe into looting, murder and anarchy? Don’t trust the impregnability of Fort Knox or the New York Fed’s basement, let alone the places you actually keep you gold? Read more »

Get yourself canned once or twice so potential employers can tell you’re serious about your work. Read more »