UBS

ubs1 3.13.35 PMBased on a judge’s ruling today. Read more »

UBSSince 2011, UBS has openly discussed/threatened the possibility of moving out of its building Stamford, CT, which houses the world’s largest trading floor, to points unknown in New York City. The thinking behind the relocation was that the bank’s morale and profit issues boiled down to people not wanting to work in Connecticut, and that everything would turn around should they find themselves further south. Recently, though, UBS hasn’t said much at all re: leaving the Nutmeg state, which makes this turn of events slightly awkward: Read more »

rbsIf you’re going to team up with other banks to manipulate interest rates and engage in other shady behavior, just make sure to be the first one to go to regulators and let them know what you’ve all been up to. Read more »

A former UBS AG banker gave a primer on the workings of Swiss bank secrecy to a Florida jury hearing the tax-conspiracy trial of Raoul Weil, who once ran the bank’s global wealth-management business. Hansruedi Schumacher told Fort Lauderdale jurors today that he oversaw UBS accounts for about 15,000 U.S. clients in 1999, and most were structured to cheat the Internal Revenue Service. Clients shunned calls or account statements from their Swiss bankers, preferring personal visits, usually in hotels, he said. Bankers often changed hotels to avoid suspicion from the staff. [Bloomberg]

Read on and learn, well, basically nothing that you could not have intuited. Read more »

Did UBS help clients evade taxes for years and years? Yes, it’s a Swiss bank and that’s what Swiss banks do (did?). Is that any reason for France to go all extortionist on its ass? UBS says no. As an aside, a spokesperson from UBS has suggestion that certain French attorneys ought to go back to law school. Read more »

The world’s biggest banks are overhauling how they trade currencies to regain the trust of customers and preempt regulators’ efforts to force changes on an industry tarnished by allegations of manipulation. Barclays Plc, Deutsche Bank AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc and UBS AG, which together account for 43 percent of foreign-exchange trading by banks, are introducing measures to make it harder for dealers to profit from confidential customer information and take advantage of clients in the largely unregulated $5.3 trillion-a-day currency market, according to people with knowledge of the changes. Banks have capped what employees can charge for exchanging currencies, limited dealers’ access to information about customer orders, banned the use of online chat rooms and pushed trades onto electronic platforms, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because they weren’t authorized to discuss their firms’ practices. [Bloomberg]