Valentine’s Day

I don’t know what it’s like at your office, but at the Securities and Exchange Commission, Valentine’s Day is a big deal. Staffers frequently beat suitors off with a stick and on February 14, the deliveries of candy, chocolates, flower arrangements, and edible undies do not stop. So when workers were notified just days before the big day that moving forward, such shipments were banned, there was no way they were going to take the news lying down. Read more »

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Fired FINRA Employee Was Nothing If Not Persistent

She reapplied for her jobs (and a couple others where the regulator had openings) 574 times, sent the object of her affection LinkedIn requests, love letters, coffee mugs, and golf balls, and sent the object of her scorn a bunch of menacing messages about looking both ways before crossing, as well as unsolicited gay and straight porno mags. Read more »

  • 14 Feb 2013 at 1:18 PM

Happy Valentine’s Day, You Unlovable Scamps

If clichés were true, the spouses and partners of investment bankers and hedge fund managers would be showered with expensive gifts on Valentine’s Day. Bankers, after all, can afford deliveries of Bollinger and blooms. The reality is less seductive and more sterile. Financial services is not a romantic industry. Bankers aren’t actually seen as desirable dates. A 2012 survey of 5,000 Britons by dating website Match.com found that bankers don’t feature in either sex’s definition of their preferred partners. Most of all, women want to date firemen, teachers and musicians. Men are keenest on nurses, scientists and accountants. One reason, of course, is bankers just don’t have much time for romance. “They tend to work extremely long hours and don’t really cross paths with anyone romantically. They are at their desks a lot,” said Hayley Bystram, a director at elite introductory agency the Bowes Lyons Partnership, which charges £6k for alerting like-minded professionals to each other’s existence. Many of her clients are financial professionals. [eFinancial]

  • 14 Feb 2012 at 4:32 PM

Dan Loeb Has A Valentine’s Day Surprise For Yahoo

The promise of a proxy battle, unless they comply with every one of his demands (e.g. replace four board members with Loeb and three of his friends). Little bit of DL trivia for the Third Point historians among us: with this latest 13-D, Loeb is reclaiming his tradition of notifying adversaries of his intent to wage war on February 14 (previous recipients of similar love letters include Salton Inc, Star Gas Partners, and AEP Industries). Sure he could have waited a day here or there but he’s a true romantic at heart. Even more thoughtful would have been delivering a copy of the filing in person via Barbershop Quartet but perhaps he’ll save that for next year’s lucky lady. [SEC]

  • 14 Feb 2012 at 1:26 PM

Hank Greenberg Might Beg To Differ

Consumers’ “better halves” will shell out the most on their partners, with the average person planning to spend $74.12 on their spouse or significant other, up from $68.98 last year. Additionally, consumers will spend and average of $25.25 on their children, parents or other family members and $6.92 on friends….the average person will spend about $4.52 on their pets. [WaPo, earlier]

  • 14 Feb 2012 at 12:46 PM

Presenting: Executive Bitches

For Valentine’s Day this year, Fortune put together a slideshow of various executives, analysts, fund managers, and disgraced AIG CEOs posing with their one true loves– their dogs. For the big names who missed the deadline to submit photos, fear not– this feature is clearly going to become an annual thing. For those already mentally directing a photoshoot of yourself and Jamie the Younger, maybe running down Park Ave or shooting hoops at the Garden, you might first consider looking to this year’s pioneering efforts for inspiration.


For instance, in addition to putting your love for each other on display, why not use the opportunity to showcase your credentials, as “Fortune All-Star Analyst” Mike Mayo does here? Read more »

Howard would come home so stressed out that he’d go ballistic about tricycles in the driveway and toys on the floor, write Paula Szuchman and Jenny Anderson in “Spousonomics,” a geeky guide to finding marital bliss through economics. His tantrums had to go, as Howard always recognized after he calmed down. So he and his wife Jen, a fellow lawyer, sought ways to check his anger. Counting to 20 didn’t work. Nor did deep breathing. Desperate, they created a game in which Jen called out “Red Flag” whenever he looked ready to explode. “If Howard went three days without a red flag, she’d have sex with him,” the authors write. As puerile as that sounds, the game worked, restoring peace to their home and rekindling their sex life: A classic economic tradeoff, to hear Szuchman and Anderson tell it. Or was it a coup for a manipulative male? [Bloomberg]