Voldemort

Jamie Dimon just did a conference call in which he mentioned something called the “Dimon Principle,” but he did not define it, so I will propose a definition, which is: If you are going to have a Slytherin alumnus running a $375bn book full of snakes and CDX and TIPS (??) and things, and someone notices and the press starts lobbing in guesses about it, and Congress starts fretting about it, and you say things like “this is a tempest in a teapot,” you have to NOT LOSE TWO BILLION DOLLARS ON IT. From JPMorgan’s just-filed Q: Read more »

  • 18 Apr 2012 at 3:27 PM

More Voldemort v. Volcker

I for one am pleased that the London Whale cannot stay out of the news despite all of JPMorgan’s best efforts to say that he’s NBD. His travels through the world’s oceans are delightful and instructive, and Mr. Whale, if you’re reading this and ever come to these shores, I’d love to buy you a drink or some plankton. On that note: lo these many hours ago I said:

Whaledemort has received a lot of Volcker-related attention for reasons that are … well, that have to do with the fact that the Volcker Rule is among other things a free-floating reason to get angry at anything a bank does that you don’t like and/or understand. But it is true that JPMorgan and others really do want a very broad portfolio hedging approach to be recognized by the Volcker Rule. … I tend to be down for that – basically I’d argue that the core function of the financial system is to hedge a bunch of risks with a bunch of historically correlated but not precisely offsetting other risks – but it makes lots of people kind of nervous because when I say “portfolio hedging” you hear “just taking a bunch of crazy risks and pretending it’s a hedge.”

And when I accused you of having that particular filter on your ears, by “you” of course I meant “Congress.” Per Jesse Eisinger: Read more »

  • 17 Apr 2012 at 5:32 PM

JPMorgan’s Voldemort Probably Isn’t That Magical

John Carney has hilariously convinced a bunch of people that JPMorgan whale-wizard Bruno Iksil might be running a synthetic bank on top of JPMorgan’s regular bank. The theory, propounded to him by a mysterious trader and sort of supported by an old PIMCO client note, is that Iksil was tasked with hedging JPMorgan’s inflation risk and did so by putting on a trade that was (1) long TIPS (for the inflation) + (2) long [write protection on] CDX (for the yield). Now I will tell you a thing, which is that I hedge my inflation risk by being (1) long TIPS (for the inflation) + (2) long MegaMillions tickets (for the yield),* but nobody calls me Voldemort.

Here is Doug Braunstein’s theory about Iksil:

On a conference call with analysts, Braunstein said the positions are meant to hedge investments the bank makes in “very high grade” securities with excess deposits. (J.P. Morgan has some $1.1 trillion in worldwide deposits.) Braunstein said the CIO positions are meant to offset the risk of a “stress-loss” in that credit portfolio. He added the CIO position is made in line with the bank’s overall risk strategy.

What can that mean? Presumably the sensible view to take from this is that this is actually part of a “stress-loss” hedge; the CIO is short (bought protection on) a lot of shorter-dated corporate credit and funds it by being long (selling protection on) a lot of longer-dated (5-year) corporate credit, so as to be relatively DV01-neutral but long jump risk. This has the advantage of (1) actually hedging a stress loss in high-grade short-term corporate securities, (2) fitting in with the relative lack of noise in the CIO portfolio,** (3) being what people have told Bloomberg Iksil was doing, and (4) being what JPMorgan has actually said it actually did in the CIO during the crisis. So it’s probably true no?

But it’s fun to pretend! If you pretend Carney is right you can have one of two views.*** One is Izabella Kaminska’s, which is “sure, I guess this is a hedge, but boy is it a mysterious one.” You can buy this if you have – as she does – a pretty postmodernist view of what a hedge is. I do too, mostly. Read more »

  • 11 Nov 2010 at 4:12 PM

Merrill Lynch Guys Got At Least One Thing Right

Say what you want about them but they knew their Harry Potter references. And shouldn’t that count for something? Read more »