Wharton

  • 04 Nov 2014 at 2:05 PM

Wharton Does Other Stuff, Too, You Know

Future entrepreneurs.Sure, sure: The nation’s first business is famous for producing famous financiers. But there’s more going on over at Huntsman Hall and Steiny-D, its newly-minted dean will have you know! Like, uh, financial entrepreneurship. Oh yea, and financial analytics and financial innovation and financial technology, to say nothing (it’s better that way) about actuarial science or football and basketball players “studying” marketing. Read more »

LBS, Wake Forest and Georgetown are turning their B-schools into, well, college. Read more »

Once again, as it does every year, US News has released its ranking of the best, not bad, and okay business schools. As this is the sort of thing that inspires unbridled rage over perceived slights like finding out your alma mater dropped one spot or having to suffer the indignity of an inferior institution being too close on the list, and many of your are plain itching to get into a fight, everyone should feel free to do it in this controlled space.

If you’re having trouble working yourself up into a lather but don’t want to be left out of the fun, perhaps consider how it must feel for Wharton to finally have cracked the number one slot only to find out that it’s being split three ways not just with Harvard but with a school that will let anyone in.

104. Northern Arizona University Read more »

After years of receiving scripted answers to questions from would-be business school students re: why they want to go to Harvard/Wharton/Stanford/Sloan or what they think of a company’s earnings potential or where they see themselves in five to ten years or what they ate for breakfast, admissions officers have lately been taking a new tack in an attempt to see the “real” side of applicants. Hoping to get a little “unrehearsed honesty” and insight into who these people really are, prospective students are being asked to submit “reflections” (“a short, off-the-cut note that must be submitted within 24 hours of an admissions interview”) and take part in “team-based discussions,” for which they’re told to “relax, be genuine,” not worry about giving the “right” answer, and just say what they really think, rather than what a coach told them to say they think. Unfortunately, Harvard and Wharton officials apparently have no idea who they’re dealing with here. You can’t make future b-school students relax and be genuine! You can’t! You won’t! Read more »

US News has regaled us with its annual ranking of the top business schools. I know you need a safe space to get huffy about perceived slights (be it your MBA program being lower than you believe is accurate or by having to suffer the indignity of an inferior institution being too close on the list), so let it out here and now. Read more »

US News has regaled us with its annual ranking of the top business schools. I know you need a safe space to get huffy about perceived slights (be it your MBA program being lower than you believe is accurate or by having to suffer the indignity of an inferior institution being too close on the list), so let it out here and now. (Tomorrow Matt will lead us in a rousing discussion over the best CFA test prep classes.)

101. Rollins College (Crummer)
[...]
25. Ohio State University (Fisher)
24. Georgetown University (McDonough)
23. Indiana University–Bloomington (Kelley)
22. Washington University in St. Louis (Olin)
21. University of Southern California (Marshall)
19. University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill (Kenan-Flagler)
19. Emory University (Goizueta)
18. Carnegie Mellon University (Tepper)
17. University of Texas–Austin (McCombs)
16. Cornell University (Johnson)
15. University of California–Los Angeles (Anderson)
13. University of Virginia (Darden)
13. University of Michigan–Ann Arbor (Ross)
12. Duke University (Fuqua)
11. New York University (Stern) Read more »

That’s how two Wharton professors, Daniel Gottlieb and Kent Smetters, model their students in a recent paper that tries to explain why so many business schools have policies – typically adopted by student vote – that prevent students from disclosing their grades to employers. Seems reasonable!

We construct a model with students, schools, and employers. Students prefer larger postschool wages but dislike studying. Schools are heterogenous in their selectivity (reputation). Under disclosure, employers can observe both a student’s grades and the school’s selectivity; under non-disclosure, an employer can only observe the partial signal of the school’s selectivity.

That model leads to a bunch of equations (no charts, sorry) with conclusions that again seem pretty reasonable. The driving force for preferring a non-disclosure policy turns out to be that mean post-graduation pay has to be higher than median pay – and the authors think that this is likely at a selective school where the top students can be very valuable, but less likely for a less-selective school where everyone is clustered closer to average ability. If the average value of a Wharton student is higher than value of the average Wharton student, then making it hard for employers to figure out who is actually valuable will let everyone get paid for the optionality:
Read more »