World Cup

You’d think that having a million foreigners flying hither and thither about your enormous country, dumping their dollars and euros and whatever into all manner of kit, feijoada and caiparinhas, might offer a little pick-me-up to the Brazilian economy. You know, like how it helped swell a little non-profit called FIFA’s coffers by $2.36 billion. But you’d be wrong. Read more »

Along with not scoring goals, the country is also not doing anything about paying its bills and thus avoiding having as many defaults in the 21st century as it had World Cup titles in the 20th. Read more »

  • 11 Jul 2014 at 12:21 PM
  • Banks

Goldman Sachs Also Did Not See Germany 7, Brazil 1 Coming

It didn’t see a lot of things coming in this World Cup. And even the things it did see coming (Argentina in the final), it changed its mind on after it did so badly seeing things coming in the group stage. Read more »

The World Cup match between the U.S. and Belgium looks like a great case of timing the market. Today’s game is scheduled to begin just as regular stock trading ends at 4 p.m. in New York. Compared with the midday start for last week’s U.S.-Germany match, there should be fewer conflicts in the workplace while giving Wall Street watering holes an earlier jump on Happy Hour. “The timing couldn’t be more appropriate,” said Philip Blancato, the chief executive officer of investment adviser Ladenburg Thalmann Funds/USA on Madison Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. “We have a group from the company that’s going to head out at the end of the work day and go watch the game together.” [Bloomberg]

  • 01 Jul 2014 at 12:59 PM

Some World Cup Games More Important Than Others

US-based BNP Paribas employees learned that the hard way. Read more »

…or there’s so little to do these days that everyone is routinely taking two-hour lunches, anyway. Read more »

Even with just a paltry 36.11% success rate, Goldman survived a highly unpredictable first round, as the equally uninspiring Brazilians they picked to win the whole thing managed to survive Cameroon and Croatia. Read more »