Always the real thing

Author:
Publish date:

Coke's marketing and innovation chief (is that really a title?) is jumping ship, after only a year and a half at the "innovation" helm.
Sure it took Coke a while (70 years) to ditch its Norman Rockwell ads, but the Company was reinvigorated with its “New” formulation in the 80s. [Pause for effect and perhaps a slow bomb dropping sound] After that billion dollar debacle, the catchy “Do-do-do-do-do” (I counted the right number of “do’s,” just hum it in your head) jingle in the 90s polished the marketing track record. Ok, maybe not (and if you hummed it in your head without committing a violent crime, kudos). Hey, at least everyone likes cuddly extremely carnivorous penguin-eviscerating polar bears when they hand out carbonated beverages, right? Not so much? How about “starry-eyed surprised” spontaneous beachside roller skating parties consisting of people far too old not to have day-jobs? No…
Other than not disadvantaging quadruple amputees trying to count the number of quality Coke ads on available digits, the marketing team at Coke has demonstrated questionable competence in oh…the past century or so. We did like the Grand Theft Auto parody with the Bugsy Malone song, but other than that the past year or so hasn’t been an exception to Coke's marketing comedy.
Coke Marketing Chief to Leave - [WSJ]

Related

Dick Fuld: "The Bros Always Wins"

As previously mentioned, if one were inclined to relive the fall of Lehman Brothers, one could do so via the bankruptcy documents that were recently made available online. There you'll find, among other things, countless examples of what has been said so many times since September 15, 2008, which is that it's amazing how delusional the people at the very top were, vis-à-vis the firm's solvency/what people thought of it/everything. Also worth marveling at? The fact that Lehman lasted as long as it did with what appear to be barely literate troglodytes running the place. [The following dialogue is re: CITIC considering an investment in a US bank and the suggestion that it is more interested in Bear Stearns.]