Tim Sykes Worried About The Negative Effects Of Fame

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Earlier today we introduced you to child prodigy Christopher Davis. He was the subject of a profile in the latest issue of Trader Monthly, which mainly focused on the fact that he's only fourteen and started trading at the tender age of eleven. And that got us wondering--would perhaps Tim Sykes, thrust into the spotlight by the same magazine, which praised him for getting his start at the age of 18, and then went on to brutally rebuff Bar Mitzvah Boy, be threatened by the new kid on the block? Apparently he isn't, but he is worried that the newfound fame might having a damning effect. Sayeth Sykes:

"I think everyone should start this young, I just hope 'Trader Daily' just doesn't warp this kid's sense of values...as you know editor-in-thief Randy Lane is all about spending all the $ made from trading, preferably on his sponsors' products..."

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Tim Sykes Is Auditioning Women To Model Bikinis And Talk About Stocks In A "Classy" Way

Remember Tim Sykes? In 2006 he was featured in Trader Monthly's 30 Under 30 list for turning his "Bar Mitzvah gifts totaling $12,415 into a pre-tax sum of just under $2 million" (and was subsequently uninvited to the magazine's party for "not behaving like a responsible member of the financial community"), starred in the first season of Wall Street Warriors, almost died in a fire  he claimed was started by Dealbreaker readers, and accused the Securities and Exchange Commission of being "rapists." Anyway, he's still alive and is currently soliciting women to help him teach people things about stocks, or something. Timothy Sykes, millionaire trader and investment teacher, has created a beauty pageant, Miss Penny Stock, to “inspire students” (or perhaps an excuse to peruse attractive women). “It’s going to be a classy competition,” Sykes insists. “It’s not going to be some ditzy girl who wants to get by on her looks, it’s going to be a girl who wants to learn stocks.” At the casting event, beauties will model “bikini and cocktail” (presumably dresses, not drinks) and be asked questions like, “Do you know about stocks?” He says more than 100 women have already applied. “She’ll be a pretty face to show what I can do with my teaching,” he continued. “I want to teach everybody, so why not models?” [NYP]