Daniel Mudd Wishes He Hadn't Been Such A Legislative Slut

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What's a girl to do? The opposing pressures of popularity (or coin) and purity have plagued the female sutler since before the Napoleonic campaigns. Certainly, there is a good bit of the camp slop that spills over into the waiting mouths of such campaign hangers-on, and it is often far too tempting to resist, even for the reluctant (but curious) victualer hopeful.
Yes, the first time hurts, but it gets much easier after that. And, $10 million later, you are an old hand. Even the notion of uttering "no" seems a far away and naive fantasy.
So, we sympathize with Harvard Alum Mudd. Crossing the line was probably hard, but once past, your legs are in the air more often and for less and less than you bargained for. Everyone is doing it, you know.
But, when the gig is up, the campaign lost, the soldiers packed up and headed back to their war brides, or fled back to friendly lines to find another, your virtue is long since gone. No daring solider in retreat to pull you up on his horse and gallop back West. And all those promises made by the troops when plunder was plentiful, broken and lost, yes? Were you naive to believe them rather than take cash in advance? Likely. But that's the least of your worries, your forgone, bonus betrayal. Your forfeited golden parachute. Now the enemy has closed in. And you will face collaborator's justice. History is written by the victors, and you overstayed your welcome, missed the signs of the turning battle, did you? Or were you just trying to squeeze out the last few tricks before the front lines folded for good?

Former Fannie Mae Chief Executive Daniel Mudd wished he said "no" to more of the things the company was asked to do, he told the Wall Street Journal in an interview. "We were asked -- or required -- to expand lending, to conserve capital while providing liquidity, to meet housing goals for the underserved, to serve shareholders and homeowners alike," Mudd told the paper.

Ex-Fannie CEO Wishes he Said "No" More Often: Report [CNBC]

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