Just Stop Talking

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Here's a clip of the investigative journalism team at Fox Business discussing footage of one of its reporters and a camera crew staking out Bernie Madoff's accountant David Friehling's house, during which Friehling's son dumps water on the network's van, and later, as DF files a complaint against Fox with the Clarkstown, NY police department. Anyway, from the b-roll, it looks like the accountant is putting up his office space for rent, so if you know anyone looking for a place, get in touch. 845-367-2247.

Bernie Madoff's Accountant Goes On The Attack
[Cityfile]

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