The Most Surprising Thing About This Story Is That Congress Did Not Make The Same Mistake

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Pity the middle-aged fool who happens to have a somewhat round, slightly doughy looking face though no other discernable physical similarities to AIG CEO Edward Liddy.

[Zippy] Duvall, president of the Georgia Farm Bureau, was minding his own business this morning as he walked down a corridor of the Rayburn House Office Building outside the hearing room where a committee was probing the AIG bonuses. Suddenly, he was surrounded by lights, television cameras and microphones.
"Are you ready for this hearing?" somebody shouted.
"Do you think they're going to treat you fairly?"
Duvall stopped to chat amiably with the mob of reporters. "If I knew I was going to get all this attention, I'd have gotten my hair cut," said the farm bureau president, who is almost completely bald.
As the questions continued to fly, one of Duvall's farm-bureau colleagues shared a thought with his suddenly-popular boss: "I think they think you're somebody else."
It was of course, a case of mistaken identity. Duvall, as it happens, bears not even a passing resemblance to AIG Chairman Edward Liddy. If the lack of Liddy's white hair didn't give it away, surely the peanut-print tie and the farm-bureau lapel pin should have. "We're here to represent farmers," Duvall explained as the questioners began to disperse.

The AIG Hearing's First Victim [WaPo via Gawker]

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