Tears In Southern Connecticut

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Fairfield Greenwich, a hedge fund ensnared in Bernie Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme, is handing over $2.5 billion remaining in four funds to Sciens Capital as Fairfield looks to salvage assets not affected by the scandal.
As part of the deal, Fairfield won't sell the funds to Sciens but instead will simply hand them over, retaining some rights to revenue, said a person familiar with the situation.

Noel's Fund Eyes Change [NYP]

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Connecticut Resident Takes Road Less Traveled In Refusing To Pay Cab Fare (Update)

While Charles Martin, too, passed out in the back of his taxi on the ride home, like his brother in arms, upon coming to he merely questioned the sexuality of the officers on the scene before threatening what would happen if they came any closer. A city man with more than $1,300 in his pocket was charged Thursday morning with trying to snub a taxicab driver out a $43 fare, police said. Charles Martin, 35, of 15 School St., Norwalk, was charged with sixth-degree larceny and resisting arrest and was held in lieu of $1,000 bond. Norwalk police Sgt. Lisa Cotto said a Stamford cab driver showed up at police headquarters just after 3:30 a.m. Thursday complaining that he had a man in his cab refusing to pay the fare from the Stamford train station to the man's School Street home. When police went to the cab, Martin was asleep and appeared drunk, telling them to leave him alone, Cotto said After he was arrested, police found $1,353 in cash in his pocket, Cotto said. Unhappy with being arrested for trying to stiff the cabbie, Martin allegedly warned the police officers -- who he also said were gay -- what would happen when they removed the cuffs from his hands. No word on what that was but odds it involved a pen knife are high. Cops: Man with $1,300 in pocket refused to pay $43 cab fare [Stamford Advocate] Related: Banking Exec Maintains Innocence Re: Stabbing Cab Driver

Greenwich, Connecticut Nobody Threatening To Dethrone Area Hedge Fund Manager As Biggest Middle-Aged Superhero Fan In Town

Exhibit A: Friday morning at AQR, August 10. Cliff Asness glanced pensively at a candy-colored array of Marvel superhero figurines lined up along his east-facing window. Spiderman. Captain America. The Hulk. Iron Man. Comic book heroes of his boyhood days on Long Island.--The Quants, by Scott Patterson, page 100. On an August morning, Asness walks to his sun-dappled office windowsill and picks up a Captain America action figure. The hedge-fund mogul owns a panoply of action heroes, from the Hulk to the Silver Surfer, and the comic books that spawned them.--Bloomberg Markets Magazine, October 7, 2010 "Hedge funds charge far too much in general by claiming to be geniuses," says Asness, lounging on a sofa in his corner office, surrounded by foot-high plastic models of comic book heroes.--Fortune, December 19, 2011 As a child, Clifford Scott Asness gave no sign of his future as a Wall Street tycoon. He was born in October 1966 in Queens, New York. When he was four, his family moved to the leafy suburban environs of Roslyn Heights on Long Island. In school Asness received good grades, but his interest in Wall Street didn’t extend beyond the dark towers of Gotham in the pages of Batman. Obsessed with little besides girls and comic books, Asness was a listless teenager, without direction and somewhat overweight. At times he showed signs of a violent temper that would erupt years later when he sat at the helm of his own hedge fund.--The Quants, by Scott Patterson, page 12. “His super-villains are intellectual dishonesty and ignorance,” says Jonathan Beinner, a managing director at Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and a former classmate of Asness. “When someone offers an opinion that Cliff feels is incorrect or dishonest, whether it be related to investments, politics or pizza, he feels it is his duty to stand up, even if it’s not in his best interest.” Asness admits to a superhero complex. His favorite Marvel comic book character is Captain America, who gains strength with the help of a secret serum and whose shield can be used as an indestructible weapon. Asness has an image of the shield tattooed on his left arm.--Bloomberg Markets Magazine, October 7, 2010 Exhibit B: The above is a rendering of a Batcave that will soon be built in the home of an unnamed Greenwich resident. When it is completed in Novemeber, the spread will include "a Batcomputer, Batmobile, Batsuits, 180 degree film screen, sound effects, gargoyles and even a Bat-themed elevator." The problem? This guy is not only infringing on Asness's territory as resident super hero obsessive/aficionado/scholar-in-residence/neighbor who dresses up and role-plays his character of choice but is apparently too cowardly to show his face or reveal his name so that Cliff might confront him. The other problem? Captain America doesn't have some kind of cool underground lair setup of his own. The only recourse? Someone spends the next couple weeks writing a series of fan fiction that describes his house, and then spends $20 million to have that built. Greenwich Resident Building $2 Million Batcave In Home [CTNews] Dark Knight superfan spends $2MILLION creating home cinema replica of Bruce Wayne's cave [DM]