An Unexpected First Step In Structured Product Reform

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In an interesting twist on curbing complex products that the average investor does not have a prayer of understanding, BlackRock is answering the Obama administration's call for offering the general public the opportunity to invest in RMBS and CMBS. The BlackRock Legacy Securities Public-Private Trust will give investors who believe that only Wall St. can benefit from bailout-related programs the chance to show off their mastery of distressed mortgage markets by paying BlackRock their usual fees to play alongside the big boys. Potential RMBS and CMBS investors should rest easy knowing that the fund will limit its distressed appetite to securities that were rated AAA by at least two agencies prior to the start of this year.

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I don't really understand it but the TVIX thing is creepy fun. If you haven't followed it, Credit Suisse issued this exchange-traded note called TVIX that was a 2x levered bet on the VIX. They suspended new issuance about a month ago due to position limits, and people were just so damn excited to own the thing that its price crept up to 189% of its fair value, where "fair value" is a reasonably easily measurable thing based on the formula in the TVIX prospectus. Then last week Credit Suisse announced that they would be creating more units, and the price plummeted to and then through fair value, which is what you'd expect to happen. Except that it started plummeting a few hours before that announcement, which is Suspicious. So of course people are sad and so there's a Bloomberg Brief with sort of sad-funny quotes like: “When it started to fall, I bought more because I couldn’t believe how low it was going. I didn’t realize I was playing with a hand grenade.” – Michael Gamble [heh! - ed.], 67, who doubled down on his TVIX investment before the price collapsed. Investors “all think: ‘Oh, I’ll just buy these things, I’ll be hedged against volatility and everything will be wonderful.’ And now they’ve seen the market goes down and their volatility protection goes down too, and they’re going ‘Hmm, what happened here?’ These people are going to have to pay a really expensive lesson.” – Larry McMillan, who manages $30 million as president of McMillan Analysis Corp. So, yes, Larry, they are going to pay a really expensive lesson. But what is it? Stephen Lubben has a little thing in DealBook today where he frets: