Are All Execution Traders Insider Traders Waiting To Happen?

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According to Bloomberg, yes. As in the case of Moore Capital's alleged little insider trader, Julian Rifat, who found the "look but don't touch" rule too difficult to abide.

Rifat was an execution trader in the London office of Moore, a New York-based firm that oversees $15 billion. His job was to get the best prices for portfolio managers without telegraphing the firm’s buying and selling to rivals. He was taken into custody on his 41st birthday.

“By definition an execution trader sits near the money; he can smell the money, but he can’t touch the money,” said Jason Kennedy, chief executive officer of London-based executive- search firm Kennedy Associates.

For any managers hoping to avoid embarrassing headlines and nationally televised perp walks, a suggestion. At the end of each day, allow these guys to strip naked and roll around in the room where you keep the cash. Let them dive, Scrooge-McDuck style into the ball pit of gold coins. Let them rub it where the sun don't shine. Let them tap that ass. Only when you remove the forbidden fruit aspect of it all will you be able to trust these guys.

In marginally related news, here's some random info about Rifat. Haven't yet figured out how it can explain his motivation but surely one of you can figure it out.

Rifat in 1984 set a local high-jump record by an under 17- year-old at 1.95 meters (6 feet, 5 inches), according to Andy McKenzie, a Gloucester Athletic Club official. He also holds one of the U.K.’s all-time best combined scores in the decathlon, according to Athletics Weekly, and competed in the event for Great Britain in an international meet in 1990.

Related

Accused Insider Trader Gave Ill-Gotten Gains To The Homeless

And for this he should do time? Gautham Shankar, of New Canaan, Connecticut, who also worked as a trader at Schottenfeld Group LLC, is scheduled to be sentenced later today by U.S. District Judge Richard Sullivan in New York. Shankar, who faces as long as 25 years in prison, earned less than $450,000 in the insider-trading scheme, his lawyer said. Shankar, who worked on the sales desk at Goldman Sachs from July 2000 until February 2003, pleaded guilty to conspiracy and a count of securities fraud in October 2009. He admitted that while working at Schottenfeld, he passed and profited from illegal tips he obtained from Zvi Goffer, a former Galleon Group LLC employee, and Thomas Hardin, a former analyst at Lanexa Global Management. “As the government learned during its meetings with Mr. Shankar, he has always, quite literally, given large sums of money away to the homeless on the streets of New York, including cash given to him by his co-conspirators for passing tips from Hardin,” his lawyer, Frederick Sosinsky, said in court papers.Helped People “From bringing the homeless a cup of coffee in the morning and sharing time with them to handing them hundreds of dollars at a time, Mr. Shankar has always been unable to simply walk past those in the most distress,” Sosinsky said. Ex-Goldman Employee Seeks Leniency for Insider Scheme [Bloomberg]