Breaking: Ivy Leaguers, Rarity On Wall Street, Try Hands At Finance

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Kids, we live in a crazy time. What's up is down, what's down is up. Nothing is predictable and you never know what's gonna happen. Take this groundbreaking piece of news: Mark Coury, a forward on the Cornell basketball team and finance major will be interning at Goldman Sachs this summer. Even crazier, despite being a college athlete, Coury demonstrates remarkable comparative analysis skills and a basic understanding of numbers.

Coury, a finance major, is good with numbers. So he knows that 12th-seeded Cornell (29-4), the first Ivy League team to reach the regional semifinals of the National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament since the University of Pennsylvania in 1979, faces a daunting task against the Wildcats.

But the shocks don't end with Mark. Apparently, and I know this going to sound crazy, other people from this Ivy League school have gone down this road less traveled.

Coury won’t be the first Cornell basketball player to spend his summer in New York at Goldman Sachs. Current teammate Louis Dale and former teammates Khaliq Gant and Jason Battle also held internships at the investment bank. Battle now is a securities analyst at Goldman Sachs.

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