Barney Frank Has Muzzled Carl Icahn

We know Carl Icahn is such a tough guy he’ll sue his friends and fellow billionaires to win deals. But, has the outspoken sultan of shareholder rights been silenced by Washington lawmakers?
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We know Carl Icahn is such a tough guy he’ll sue his friends and fellow billionaires to win deals. But, has the outspoken sultan of shareholder rights been silenced by Washington lawmakers?

The billionaire's blog, The Icahn Report, launched nearly two years ago with much fanfare to take on inept corporate boards, has been radio silent for nearly a year. (Icahn also started a grassroots campaign - The United Shareholders of America - at the same time.)

Carl, WTF? We need you. Are you too busy sparring with The Donald and Lions Gate to weigh in on financial reform and corporate governance?

We hear Wall Street’s toughest activist investor halted the blog last April because it pissed off too many of his pals in Washington, where he was also lobbying behind the scenes for changes to proxy rules. One of those was influential, but sensitive Congressman Barney Frank, who we hear gave Carl an earful after he wrote an op-ed in the New York Times arguing the government should have gotten board seats at A.I.G. after taking an 80 percent stake in the company and suggesting Frank’s idea of suing the beleaguered insurance giant would have little chance of success. (The op-ed was then posted on Icahn’s blog.)

Carl, don’t let Barney push you around. You’re way taller and have much more in your bank account. (We reached out to Icahn but haven’t heard back yet - we know he doesn’t wake up until noon so hopefully we’ll hear from him soon)

Icahn says blog to go live on Thursday [Reuters]

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