Kerry Killinger Fell On Non-Colorblind Side Of Ang Moz Debate

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When it comes down to it, there are two types of people in this world. Those who, when asked the question, what is Angelo Mozilo’s race, answer “African American,” and those who answer “Tanning bed-Orange.” Thanks to today's hearing on the hill, and the the Senate's 600+ page report on Wamu's death, we now know that former CEO Kerry Killinger was proud to count himself among the latter.

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