Battle Between Raj and WSJ Continues

Last week, we told you about a letter sent by Raj Rajaratnam’s new PR guy, Jim McCarthy to Wall Street Journal editor Mike Siconolfi complaining about the paper’s use of anonymous sources in their coverage of Raj. The specific complaint was that the paper used the phrase “a person familiar with the situation” to refer to their source, instead of identifying any inherent biases the source might have.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

Last week, we told you about a letter sent by Raj Rajaratnam’s new PR guy, Jim McCarthy, to Wall Street Journal editor Mike Siconolfi complaining about the paper’s use of anonymous sources in their coverage of Raj. The specific complaint was that the paper used the phrase “a person familiar with the situation” to refer to their source, instead of identifying any inherent biases the source might have.

Well, McCarthy doesn’t seem to have gotten the response he was looking for. In a new letter to deputy managing editor Alix Freeman, released yesterday on Raj's new web site, McCarthy claims Siconolfi scheduled a call to talk about the issue, but wouldn't talk unless the conversation remained under wraps.

Mike kindly scheduled a call earlier this week so that we could discuss the matter, but when that call began he oddly insisted that I agree no aspect of what was said be repeated publicly. Otherwise, he would refuse to talk to me.

I must say I found that posture ironic for a newspaperman, someone who supposedly values transparency and accountability and who demands exactly that from the subjects and sources he speaks with every day. I remain at a loss to understand his rationale and, as for the substance, suffice it to say my questions in the letter remain on the table.

McCarthy clearly believes the government is leaking sensitive information about the case against Raj to WSJ investigative reporter Susan Pulliam and he has also written a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder asking him to look into the leaks. McCarthy's firm, which helped decriminalize Peyote use among American Indians, is known for fighting back against attacks against its clients.

Related

Raj Rajaratnam Launches Web Site, Says Wiretaps Are Illegal

In addition to putting up a fancy new website, Raj Rajaratnam and his lawyers made a motion today to suppress the government's wiretap evidence. In a 75-page brief, lawyers for Raj laid out their argument that FBI Special Agent B.J. Kang and the U.S. Attorney’s office in the Southern District of Manhattan intentionally misled the court when they sought authorization secretly listen in on Raj's cell phone.

Justice Department Probes Leaks in Galleon Case

Looks like Raj Rajaratnam’s complaints about leaks coming out the Justice Department on the Galleon case have not fallen on deaf ears. Raj’s attorney’s announced today that they have been informed by The DOJ’s Office of Professional Responsibility that it has opened an investigation into alleged leaks by the FBI and the U.S. Attorney’s office to the Wall Street Journal and other news outlets.

Rajaratnam Seeks Reversal of Wiretap Ruling

Attorneys for Raj Rajaratnam have filed a brief to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals seeking to reverse an order compelling them to turn over wiretap evidence to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Letter Reveals More Names in Galleon Case

Roomy Khan, one of the key cooperating witnesses in the Galleon insider trading case, used her extensive rolodex of insiders to gain access to secret market-moving information. Recently released court documents show that list of contacts could be longer than we thought.