Blanche Lincoln Ain't Backing Down from Derivatives Overhaul

Sen. Blanche Lincoln, Arkansas Democrat, was able to push her controversial derivatives amendment into the financial regulatory reform bill yesterday, despite threats from Wall Street. And any banker that thinks Blanche is going to back off derivatives reform after she wins the Arkansas primary runoff on June 8 has no clue how hard-nosed she really is.
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Sen. Blanche Lincoln, Arkansas Democrat, was able to push her controversial derivatives amendment into the financial regulatory reform bill yesterday, despite threats from Wall Street. And any banker that thinks Blanche is going to back off derivatives reform after she wins the Arkansas primary runoff on June 8 has no clue how hard-nosed she really is.

“Suggestions that my provisions are the result of the current political climate are completely baseless,” Ms. Lincoln told DealBook. “I am not concerned about politics when Americans are depending on us to ensure that our financial system is secure.”

We’ll see about that. In the meantime, we wonder if Sen. Lincoln is tough enough to do a Dunkaroo - an old Arkansas drinking tradition perfected in Little Rock.

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