Goldman Sachs Employees Deeply Uncomfortable With Seeing Each Others' Sacks, Sweat

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As has been previously mentioned, while there is much to get excited about at the new Goldman Sachs building (a panorama that includes New York Harbor, the Sky Lobby cafeteria offers "a deep panini lineup and deadly cupcakes," safe rooms on every floor), there is something that many GS employees are not enthused about at all. And that's seeing each others' asses, etc, in the company steam room. Today we have yet another complaint from the inside, again related to an aversion to being grossed out by each others' bodies. An anonymous Mistress of the Universe writes:

I like my gyms in basement lairs, though; the better not to be seen as I pant and sweat. Using the Goldman gym was awkward enough – they give out uniforms, and it’s kind of strange to see your managing director on the elliptical next to you in a pair of grey cotton gym shorts – that I ultimately got a membership at a more, um, diverse place. But now, it’s even weirder – you access the gym by a huge spiral staircase that lets off at a huge spiral set of sliding glass doors. It feels like something out of minority report. Right behind those doors are already people working out in plain view, and it creeped me out so much to see people essentially riding exercise bikes while looking straight at me through a glass wall that I turned on my heel and fled back upstairs.

Eagle Eye [Architizer via BI]

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