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Citi Would Like To Make It Clear It Did Not Pay Debrahlee Lorenzana A Dime

Remember Debrahlee Lorenzana? For those with short memories, two years ago, Lorenzana sued Citibank for firing her for allegedly being "too hot," a claim representatives of the bank denied several times, while also calling her an attention whore. After the initial hoopla, interest in Lorenzana, who once appeared on a TV show discussing her reasons for having her breasts enlarged (she wanted to look like "tits on a stick" in order to attract a "professional, well-educated man) died down and many likely forgot about the story of T's on an S versus Citi.  In a Daily News article today, though, Debs said that she passed on a settlement wanting instead to "press on." While it's not clear that anyone reading the piece took it to mean Lorenzana had in fact received damages for her hotness, Citi, which long ago had it with this chick, was not having it. Lest there be any confusion about whether or not she extracted jack from Vikram et al, the bank has gone on record to say: "The case is concluded, and Citibank did not enter into any kind of a settlement with Ms. Lorenzana or provide any payment to her."

Business School Applicants Having None Of This "Show Us You Can Speak Without Paying A Consultant $500 To Show You How" Crap

After years of receiving scripted answers to questions from would-be business school students re: why they want to go to Harvard/Wharton/Stanford/Sloan or what they think of a company's earnings potential or where they see themselves in five to ten years or what they ate for breakfast, admissions officers have lately been taking a new tack in an attempt to see the "real" side of applicants. Hoping to get a little "unrehearsed honesty" and insight into who these people really are, prospective students are being asked to submit "reflections" ("a short, off-the-cut note that must be submitted within 24 hours of an admissions interview") and take part in "team-based discussions," for which they're told to "relax, be genuine," not worry about giving the "right" answer, and just say what they really think, rather than what a coach told them to say they think. Unfortunately, Harvard and Wharton officials apparently have no idea who they're dealing with here. You can't make future b-school students relax and be genuine! You can't! You won't!