Descendent Of Mr. Goldman (Sachs) Not Too Happy About The Way A Certain Someone Is Running Her Grandfather's Firm

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As you're likely aware, there are a whole bunch of people who've been giving Lloyd Blankfein shit for the past year or so. Pissant members of Congress, peasants, PETA. They've been a bit of a nuisances but their impotent rage has been fairly easy to brush and in many cases laugh off. None of them are writing books about GS and most of them cannot claim to know that the firm's founder, Marcus Goldman, or his son, Henry, would be pissed about how the place has "changed." And then you have June Breton Fishe, great granddaughter and granddaughter of Marcus and Hank, respectively. She is writing a book on how much better things were when her relatives were running the place and she has a couple grievances to air with Mr. B. Such as, respect, or a lackthereof as indicated by this shit:

“The entryway on Goldman Sachs’s executive floor is hung with paintings of all the senior partners since the firm’s inception,” says June Breton Fisher. “I took a close look and finally asked, ‘Where’s my grandfather?’”

He wasn’t there. No portrait, no photograph, not even a snapshot recalled Henry Goldman, the founder’s son whose financial innovations created the modern banking business.

Oh, and do you want her opinion on "the current situation" over at 200 West (which I think we're supposed to infer as "the state of Goldman being a criminal enterprise")? No? Well you're gonna get it anyway.

I find it disappointing. My grandfather and Mr. Sachs were very ethical, moral businessmen and what they really wanted to do above all else was preserve the Goldman Sachs name.

But perhaps what's most disturbing to JBF is what she sees as a lack of sartorial innovation, one of the hallmarks of the old GS.

We spent summer vacations as a family at my grandparents’ home in the Adirondack Mountains. You could see him in a more relaxed mode, see the fun side of him, like when he went around in a cape and a crown.

Unlike some people.

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A week ago today, a man named Greg Smith resigned from Goldman Sachs. As a sort of exit interview, Smith explained his reasons for departing the firm in a New York Times Op-Ed entitled "Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs." The equity derivatives VP wrote that Goldman had "veered so far from the place I joined right out of college that I can no longer in good conscience say I identify with what it stands for." Smith went on to note that whereas the Goldman of today is "just about making money," the Goldman he knew as a young pup "revolved around teamwork, integrity, a spirit of humility, and always doing right by our clients." It was a culture that made him "love working for the firm" and its absence had stripped him of "pride and belief" he once held in the place. While claiming that Goldman Sachs has become virtually unrecognizable from the institution founded by Marcus (Goldman) and Samuel (Sachs), which put clients ahead of its own interests, is hardly a new argument, there was something about Smith's words that gave readers a moment's pause. He was so deeply distraught over the differences between the Goldman of 2012 and the Goldman of 2000 (when he was hired) that suggested...more. That he'd seen things. Things that had made an imprint on his soul. Things that he couldn't forget. Things that he held up in his heart for how Goldman should be and things that made it all the more difficult to ignore when it failed to live up to that ideal. Things like this: