Should We Hold Out Hope For The Goldman Documentary?

Author:
Publish date:
Updated on

Probably not, but hear me out. Goldman is making a documentary about itself. Here's why we really shouldn't give rat's ass: because Goldman is "paying for the film, has editorial control and is overseeing the project through its marketing department." Also, it will only be distributed to employees, as a sort of pick me up of sorts, that Lloyd can watch when he's feeling a bit melancholy or in the event of another really bad day. The bank has hired a real filmmaker, Ric Burns, to make the thing, which is kind of like asking the Coen Brothers to tape your son's Bar Mitzvah. So, the very serious odds are the thing is going to suck, if you were looking for any sort of drama, intrigue, conflict or humor. But. As one guy told the Journal, it is quite strange for Burns to take on this project.

Given the company's starring role in the financial crisis, some filmmakers are skeptical about Mr. Burns's movie. "It is very unusual for a documentary maker of his stature to take on a project like this, and especially one with strings attached," said Robert Greenwald, whose 2005 documentary, "Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price," cast an unflattering look at the retailer. "It goes against everything we fight for as documentary makers."

And that just makes me think, and cross my fingers, and hope for one slim but potentially incredible outcome, that only Burns can make happen. Two words my friends: America's Sweethearts. Show us the good stuff, B.

Related

Goldman Sachs Can Fix This

A week ago today, a man named Greg Smith resigned from Goldman Sachs. As a sort of exit interview, Smith explained his reasons for departing the firm in a New York Times Op-Ed entitled "Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs." The equity derivatives VP wrote that Goldman had "veered so far from the place I joined right out of college that I can no longer in good conscience say I identify with what it stands for." Smith went on to note that whereas the Goldman of today is "just about making money," the Goldman he knew as a young pup "revolved around teamwork, integrity, a spirit of humility, and always doing right by our clients." It was a culture that made him "love working for the firm" and its absence had stripped him of "pride and belief" he once held in the place. While claiming that Goldman Sachs has become virtually unrecognizable from the institution founded by Marcus (Goldman) and Samuel (Sachs), which put clients ahead of its own interests, is hardly a new argument, there was something about Smith's words that gave readers a moment's pause. He was so deeply distraught over the differences between the Goldman of 2012 and the Goldman of 2000 (when he was hired) that suggested...more. That he'd seen things. Things that had made an imprint on his soul. Things that he couldn't forget. Things that he held up in his heart for how Goldman should be and things that made it all the more difficult to ignore when it failed to live up to that ideal. Things like this: