Paul Krugman Has Just About Had It With Chris Christie

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The Professor has had it up to here with the governor who comes bearing the same first name as his last and sat down at his blog to say as much this morning. He's pretty exasperated (note the curt, sarcastic "awesome") but was still able to sassily get his Jersey on in a way that you know made him laugh this AM.

Many reports that Chris Christie is about to scuttle the second rail tunnel under the Hudson. If so, it’s arguably the worst policy decision ever made by the government of New Jersey — and that’s saying a lot. The story seems to be that Christie wants to divert the funds to road and bridge repair; but in so doing he would (a) lose huge matching funds from the Port Authority and the Feds (b) delay indefinitely a project NJ needs desperately ASAP. He could avoid these consequences by raising gasoline taxes. But no, taxes must never be raised, no matter what the tradeoffs.

And it’s a social bad too: now is very much the time when we should be ramping up infrastructure spending, not cutting it.

Awesome.

And yes, if anyone should mention it, I am a resident of New Jersey who often visits Manhattan, and therefore has a personal stake in this project. You got a problem with that?

Update: And then this happened.
Tunnel Of Idiocy [NYT]

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