Bank Of America: Hungry Like The Wolf

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Wall Street loves to describe itself as various animals. Given. You've got your bulls and bears of course, but many firms like to put their own original spin on things. For instance, at Bridgewater, employees are told to "be the hyena, attacking the wildebeest." And at Bank of America, according to a new book by Greg Farrell, at least under the regime of Ken Lewis and his underboss Steele Alphin, they were wolves.

"We're like the wolf," Alphin said, leaning over his chair, a playful smile on his face. "The wolf doesn't hunt for packs of animals. It stays behind the pack and looks for the weak ones that can't keep up, or the ones who wander from the pack." [Greg] Fleming was transfixed. "My advice to you is to stay up front with the herd," Alphin said, warming to his topic. "Stay at the front of the pack. If not, the wolf will get you. And remember, the wolf is hungry and rarely fails." Fleming started to say something but didn't know what to say. Alphin continued. "It's your decision, but the view is better from the front of the pack. Do know there is a wolf there and he will get you. And the wolf is hungry." Alphin made a playful biting gesture with his hand, in case Fleming didn't grasp the meaning of his words. "He'll git you."

The Wolfman Of Bank Of America [Daily Intel]

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