Goldman Sachs Wasn't So Sure About This John Paulson Guy In 2006

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Goldman Sachs investor Jim Clark was particularly irked by the disclosures surrounding Abacus. He had met with Paulson and Co founder John Paulson in August 2006 and been impressed by the manager’s plans to bet against the subprime-mortgage market. His Goldman brokers talked him out of investing with Paulson, describing him as a bit player, Clark says. Paulson generated a 590 percent return in his flagship credit fund in 2007 “When it came out that Paulson had the biggest payday in history, I got angry,” Clark says. [Bloomberg]

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