Can Goldman Sachs Help Facebook Expand Its Hooker Base?

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According to a new study, prostitutes are "flocking" to Facebook to peddle their services in record numbers, with an estimated 83 percent of working girls using the website to reel in clients and projections that by the end of 2011 Facebook will be "the leading online recruitment space" (for those looking to pay to lay). Still, for every, "Molly Ravish," who says she charges $200 "for an hour of passion, including deep french kissing and oral sex," and suggests potential customers remember her name because they'll be "screaming it later," or Fordham student "Beva Langoria," who describes herself as an independent escort, or an NYPD spokesman who shrugs and says "everybody is using the internet," there's a hooker saying no way, no how. Now that Goldman Sachs has a vested interest in getting as many Facebook users signed up as possible, in addition to making it the premier destination for everything from catching up with old friends to buying ass, will they help change some minds?

Like that of this potential money-maker?

A 32-year-old escort told the Daily News she would never advertise her services on Mark Zuckerberg's site. "It's a place for teenagers to socialize, to play games, to meet friends - not a place for some dumb ass to find a piece of ass," declared the escort, who asked to remain anonymous.

This holdout could be the difference between a 50 billion dollar company and a 50 trillion dollar company.

Facebook friends take on new meaning as hookers are said to be flocking to social networking site [NYDN]

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