Maybe This Story About An Investment Banker Biting A Subordinate's Ear Off "Mike Tyson-Style" Isn't As Bad As It Sounds? - Dealbreaker

Maybe This Story About An Investment Banker Biting A Subordinate's Ear Off "Mike Tyson-Style" Isn't As Bad As It Sounds?

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Maybe it was intended to be a playful nibble that went awry?

"When people hear “woman” and “Wall Street,” they expect to hear about sexual harassment. I’ve certainly heard plenty of horror stories from women in their 40s or 50s. They were propositioned by every boss, ordered to wear short skirts, passed over for promotion in favor of under-qualified dunderheads…The list goes on. But by the time I came to Wall Street, the culture had changed, and you couldn’t get away with harassing co-workers in that way. That doesn’t mean there wasn’t any inappropriate behavior, however. Every banker has her own stories, and my friends and I still trade them around.

On one occasion, during an argument at a team dinner, a senior officer leaned over as if to whisper something in his junior colleagues’ ear and then, according to a witness, took a bite out of it, “Mike Tyson style.”

A Woman On Wall Street [WSJ]

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Which Goldman Sachs CEO "Was Known To Challenge Subordinates To Impromptu Wrestling Matches"?

Was it: a) Lloyd Blankfein b) Hank Paulson c) Jon Corzine d) Stephen Friedman e) Gus Levy f) John Whitehead g) John Weinberg h) Sidney Weinberg i) Marcus Goldman j) other Hopefully you answered D, Stephen Friedman, as that was the answer we were looking for, per a New York Observer piece on financial services employees who feel more comfortable in a onesie than a suit. “I wrestled as well as I could wrestle, and if I lost, that was my own fault,” KKR’s Henry Kravis once told an interviewer about what he learned from wrestling. “I had nobody to blame but myself.” Apollo Global Management co-founder Josh Harris wrestled at the University of Pennsylvania before deciding that making his 118-pound weight class didn’t allow either the time or calories for the old “college experience.” Former Goldman Sachs chief executive officer Stephen Friedman, an AAU champion who wrestled at Cornell, was known to challenge subordinates to impromptu matches. Former Merrill Lynch CEO John Thain was a college wrestler, though Mr. Novogratz pointed out that Mr. Thain, now CIT Group CEO, wrestled at the Division III level. Fortress Chieftain Mike Novogratz Wrestles with Olympians, Youth…and Wall Street [NYO]