What Wall Street Can Learn From The Southwest Pilot Suspended For Sizing Up Colleagues While Mic'd Up

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Thinking about taking a few minutes to evaluate the attractiveness of your co-workers to the guy or girl who sits next to you? Maybe don't do it over the PA system? Or into a bullhorn? Or near a recording device?

In the raunchy rant, the unidentified pilot unleashed a slew of expletives as he ripped into his co-workers' sexuality, age and size..."There's 12 flight attendants...Eleven (expletive) over the top (expletive), (expletive) homosexuals and a granny," the pilot said, clearly unaware his cockpit microphone became stuck open. "Eleven. I mean, think of the odds of that. I thought I was in Chicago, which was party-land. "After that, it was just a continuous stream of gays and grannies and grands." Seconds later, the pilot offered his unsavory views of Houston flight attendants. "Now I'm back in Houston, which is easily one of the ugliest bases," the pilot told his co-pilot in the recording obtained by Houston TV station KPRC. "I mean it's all these (expletive) old dudes and grannies and there's like maybe a handful of cute chicks."

The diatribe, broadcast over the Houston air traffic control radio frequency on March 25, blocked communication between air traffic controllers and other pilots for more than two minutes, ABC News reported. At one point, the air traffic controller in Houston tried to interrupt the onslaught. "OK, whoever is, uh, transmitting, better watch what you're saying," the controller said.

Southwest Airlines suspends pilot after sexist, profanity-laced rant broadcast across Texas airspace [NYDN]

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