Paulson And Co Investors Standing By Their Man

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John Paulson, the billionaire hedge- fund manager having the worst year of his career, has received less than 10 percent in redemption requests for his Recovery and Credit Opportunities funds for year’s end, according to two people familiar with the firm. Withdrawal orders for those two funds, which together managed about $15 billion as of July 31, were due at the end of September and may give some indication of what total redemptions could be across all of Paulson’s funds, the worst-performing of which has tumbled 47 percent this year...“We’re going to give Paulson the benefit of the doubt,” said Trip Kuehne, founder of Double Eagle Capital Management LP, a Dallas-based firm that has invested with Paulson since 2005. “I believe in him and his firm and don’t plan to pull my money.” [Bloomberg]

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As Paulson and Co employees, clients, and people named John Paulson do not need to be told, the past year and half has not been the most joyous of times for the hedge fund giant. After making billions shorting subprime mortgages, the firm ended 2011 down 55 percent, was down 16 percent through the first half of 2012, and as of July, saw assets under management decline 44.9 percent to $21 billion from $38.1 billion, due to a combination of unfortunate performance and redemptions by investors so angry at the fund that they've felt the need to repeatedly tell anyone who will listen that parting ways with P&C was among the best if not the best decision they've ever made. One investor that hasn't had to consider voicing its unhappiness to the press or even worry about losing money at all? The 92nd Street Y. Last November Paulson guaranteed that he would personally cover their losses, whatever they turned out to be, come year-end. And the generosity did not stop there: for this one investor only, Paulson offered his services pro-bono, waiving all fees. So while he probably didn't expect representatives of the Y to rent a skywriting plane to proclaim their love and appreciation for him over midtown, lobby the city of New York to get 92nd renamed Paulson Street, or have his face tattooed to their chests, he probably also figured they wouldn't turn around and hit him the mother of all slaps in the face. In this case the declaration that despite the highly favorable terms of their arrangement, any involvement with P&C still felt a tad too risky for everyone's comfort level. In the midst of the financial crisis, the 92nd Street Y came up with a sweetheart deal for its endowment: investments in funds run by the likes of John Paulson, Marc Lasry, and other hedge-fund luminaries that were fee-free and guaranteed against losses. The strategy performed well for several years, said people familiar with how it worked, as the Y benefited from risk-free investing in some of the fund industry’s most successful strategies. But, concerned about the impact of a catastrophe in which a money manager couldn’t repay losses and eager to construct a more diversified portfolio, the Y recently opted to redeem its hedge-fund investments, these people said, and rebuild its financial strategy from scratch. Paulson himself is worth $15 billion, so a catastrophe in which he couldn't repay the Y's losses would have to be a big one. And don't give him some line about how you're pulling out of all hedge fund investments and it's not personal. You could have let him have this. Despite Sweet Deal, 92nd Street Y Redeems Paulson Money [CNBC] Earlier: John Paulson: I’ll Get The Losses This Year, Next Year We Go Dutch?

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Which is pretty nice of him. John Paulson, the billionaire hedge- fund manager seeking to reverse record losses in 2011, lost 6.7 percent last month in one of his largest funds as gold-mining stocks dropped, said two people briefed on the returns. The decline leaves Advantage Plus, which seeks to profit from corporate events such as takeovers and bankruptcies and uses leverage to amplify returns, down 8.8 percent this year, said the people...Paulson & Co. will now send a “brief commentary” along with its monthly performance estimates to investors, Paulson said in the letter. He is seeking to reverse 2011 losses from an ill-timed bet on an economic recovery, which caused him to scale back risk before stock markets started to rally late in the year. About 20 percent of Paulson’s investor base is currently underwater on the fund holdings, one of the people said. Paulson Hedge Fund Said to Extend Slump With April Loss [Bloomberg]