Tim Geithner Still Under The Impression He Can Leave Washington Whenever He Pleases

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Remember, back in June, when Tim Geithner said he was considering retiring from his post at the Treasury after the debt deal passed, telling friends that he was tired, needed a break and wanted to put family first (his wife and son live in Westchester, where the latter is finishing high school)? And the White House was all, "good one, buddy!" and "joked" about forcing him to wear an ankle monitoring bracelet before making clear in no uncertain terms that TG wasn't going anywhere? Apparently Tim doesn't. Which would explain the laughable statement he made earlier today, vis-à-vis being allowed to go home any time soon:

Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner said he doesn’t expect President Barack Obama to ask him to stay in office if he’s re-elected, and dismissed Wall Street’s concerns about financial regulations. “He’s not going to ask me to stay on, I’m pretty confident,” Geithner said in an interview with Bloomberg Television today. “I’m confident he’ll be president. But I’m also confident he’s going to have the privilege of having another secretary of the Treasury.”

And Obama is confident you make one move for that door and the Secret Service throws you down the hole with the lotion again.

Geithner: Obama Wouldn’t Ask Me to Stay in a Second Term [Bloomberg]
Earlier: Rebuttal #1: Don’t be a prick. Rebuttal #2: Bros before Larchmont hoes

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Congressman Was This Close To Telling Tim Geithner He Was Cruisin' For A Brusin'

“You can smile and laugh about it all you want,” Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R., Utah) bristled at Mr. Geithner during a House Budget Committee hearing. Mr. Chaffetz then intoned he was getting sick of the Treasury secretary’s “silly little smirk.” To be sure, Mr. Geithner did have a smile on his face during parts of the hearing, particularly when he was interrupted by Republicans on the panel when they didn’t like his answers on deficit reduction. He even spent part of the hearing answering questions with his arms crossed. At one point, he suggested that Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R., Kan.) had an “adolescent perspective” on how the economy worked.