Brothel CEO Was A Pretty Nice Boss

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Gristina reportedly ran a top-shelf operation, carefully choosing her stable of women and screening potential clients...the married mother of four took just a 40% cut of her employees’ billings during her 15 years in business — well below the industry standard 50-50 split with working girls, say sources. The madam’s generosity was one of the things that escort Lizzie most appreciated from her 44-year-old boss. [NYDN, Earlier: I'm a CEO, I'm building an empire]

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Bob Diamond Lieutenant Jerry Del Missier Ended Up Faring A Bit Better In The Parting Gifts Department Than The Boss

The bad news is that former Barclays chief operating officer Jerry del Missier is still out of a job and it may be some time before he gets a new one, on account of "investigations conducted by American and British authorities [demonstrating] he was a central figure" in the scandal du jour and "asked other bank officials to lower the firm’s submissions to Libor." The good news is that Jer is still (probably) getting paid, unlike some people he knows. Barclays was mired in fresh controversy on Wednesday night after handing almost £9m to a top banker who left following the Libor scandal and after one of its highest profile non-executive directors suddenly quit, taking the toll at the top to four. Jerry del Missier, who resigned after telling subordinates to reduce the bank's Libor submission during the October 2008 banking crisis, was reported to have been handed £8.75m cash as part of his leaving package. Shadow Treasury minister Chris Leslie called on del Missier to follow Diamond and waive the bulk of his payoff. "Having resigned from Barclays over the Libor fixing scandal, people will find the scale of this award completely inappropriate. Bob Diamond rightly waived most of his pay off and Mr del Missier ought to do the same," Leslie said. £9m leaving deal for Barclays deputy Jerry del Missier [Guardian] Former Top Barclays Official in Line for $13.6 Million Payout [Dealbook]

Bonus Watch '12: Retired Citigroup CEOs

Uncle Vik may or may not be getting a little something extra in his stocking, depending on how generous Citi is feeling. Vikram Pandit, who stepped down yesterday as Citigroup’s chief executive officer, stands to forfeit almost $33 million in cash and stock from a retention package unless the board gives him a payout to ease his exit. Citigroup formulated a plan last year that, based on the firm’s performance so far, would have given Pandit $19 million through a profit-sharing agreement, deferred stock now valued at $9 million and $4.6 million in options, according to the terms of a May 2011 regulatory filing and data compiled by Bloomberg. The plan required Pandit, 55, to be employed at the bank through various payment dates, most of which haven’t been reached. It’s typical for CEOs who resign to forfeit previously negotiated severance and to work out an alternative payout agreement with the board, said Steven Hall, managing director of Steven Hall & Partners, a New York-based executive compensation consulting firm. Pandit getting nothing would signal that “he stood up and said, ‘I’m resigning,’” Hall said. If he gets a payout, “then the question is, did they give him that in order to smooth the path to his resignation or termination? Or did they look at him and say, ‘You know what, you did a hell of a good job during a very, very rough time, we’d like to do something nice for you,’” Hall said. Pandit Could Forgo $33 Million as Exit Voids Retention Plan [Bloomberg]