President Of Multi-Billion Dollar Investment Firm Will Fire The Next Degenerate Caught Leaving a Dirty Dish In the Sink Before He Will Hire a Janitor

From: [redacted] Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 4:57 PM To: Office-CT Subject: The end of my rope. Ten days ago I entered the kitchen at 6 pm at the end of the day to find a sink full of dirty dishes. I cleaned them and put them in the dishwasher. Today I just went in the kitchen and again there is a sink full of dirty dishes. Let me make this clear. THERE IS A SIGN OVER THE SINK FOR A REASON…..no one in this office is paid to be your personal janitor. If I catch anyone leaving their dirty dishes in the sink, you will be fired. [redacted] President and Chief Operating Officer Obviously this an amazing story we're going to be following closely. At this time we do have a few questions that need answering and they are: 1) What was the first thought that crossed this guy's mind upon entering the kitchen and seeing the mess yesterday? Was it "These filthy fucking animals"? 2) What level of slop are we talking about here? Was it every available fork and stacks and stacks of plates with disgusting crusted-on grease or was it, like, a water glass and he'd just reached that point where one more dirty dish pushes you over the edge? 3) His boss is a billionaire who might very well think he's paying someone to act as a personal janitor-- if he's one of the culprits will the same vigilante justice and dressing down be served? 4) Has he installed surveillance cameras to monitor the area? On the one hand, this email would suggest that yes, he most certainly has. On the other, though, he sort of sounds like he's so pissed about this shit that he's going to shelve all of his other responsibilities in order to devote himself full time to staking out the kitchen and nailing these lowlifes.
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This much he promises you.

From: [redacted]
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 4:57 PM
To: Office-CT
Subject: The end of my rope.

Ten days ago I entered the kitchen at 6 pm at the end of the day to find a sink full of dirty dishes. I cleaned them and put them in the dishwasher. Today I just went in the kitchen and again there is a sink full of dirty dishes.

Let me make this clear. THERE IS A SIGN OVER THE SINK FOR A REASON…..no one in this office is paid to be your personal janitor. If I catch anyone leaving their dirty dishes in the sink, you will be fired.

[redacted]
President and Chief Operating Officer

Obviously this an amazing story we're going to be following closely. At this time we do have a few questions that need answering and they are: 1) What was the first thought that crossed this guy's mind upon entering the kitchen and seeing the mess yesterday? Was it "These filthy fucking animals"? 2) What level of slop are we talking about here? Was it every available fork and stacks and stacks of plates with disgusting crusted-on grease or was it, like, a water glass and he'd just reached that point where one more dirty dish pushes you over the edge? 3) His boss is a billionaire who might very well think he's paying someone to act as a personal janitor-- if he's one of the culprits will the same vigilante justice and dressing down be served? 4) Has he installed surveillance cameras to monitor the area? On the one hand, this email would suggest that yes, he most certainly has. On the other, though, he sort of sounds like he's so pissed about this shit that he's going to shelve all of his other responsibilities in order to devote himself full time to staking out the kitchen and nailing these lowlifes.

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