Broker Involved In Unsanctioned "Wolfpack Ragematch" At New York Athletic Club Will Not Be Getting Off

Remember the fight that broke out at the New York Athletic Club last month, which a witness described as a "nondiscriminatory ragematch" involving "young people, old people, girls, members, and nonmembers," which started as a tiff over a woman and "escalated into a brawl involving three fighting wolfpacks," wherein "tables were overturned or moved to the room's periphery to crate a lion's pit for the battle," a "fat pudgy kid came out of nowhere, laid out a larger man with a blow to the head and was tackled by a crowd," approximately two noses were broken, and the police made three arrests? Oddly, it looks unlikely that the guy who did "the most damage" (to people's faces) will be walking away with a slap on the wrist. Manhattan prosecutors aren’t cutting any slack for the handsome broker charged with doing the most damage at an unbridled bar brawl at the otherwise stodgy New York Athletic Club. The DA's office is not making any plea offers for Colin Drowica, 30, of Glen Head, LI, prosecutors said yesterday, as the glum-looking alleged brawler stood before a criminal court judge in a gray business suit. Drowica, a director at Knight Capital, is charged with harassment and misdemeanor assault — which carries up to one year jail — for allegedly punching another man in the club’s Tap Room with enough force to fracture his eye socket. Drowica then joined with fellow North Shore resident clubgoers Peter Doran and Matthew O’Grady in allegedly beating the heck out of a second man during the April 13 free-for-all. Manhattan DA not pulling any punches in charging broker in NYAC brawl [NYP]
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Remember the fight that broke out at the New York Athletic Club last month, which a witness described as a "nondiscriminatory ragematch" involving "young people, old people, girls, members, and nonmembers," which started as a tiff over a woman and "escalated into a brawl involving three fighting wolfpacks," wherein "tables were overturned or moved to the room's periphery to crate a lion's pit for the battle," a "fat pudgy kid came out of nowhere, laid out a larger man with a blow to the head and was tackled by a crowd," approximately two noses were broken, and the police made three arrests? Oddly, it looks unlikely that the guy who did "the most damage" (to people's faces) will be walking away with a slap on the wrist.

Manhattan prosecutors aren’t cutting any slack for the handsome broker charged with doing the most damage at an unbridled bar brawl at the otherwise stodgy New York Athletic Club. The DA's office is not making any plea offers for Colin Drowica, 30, of Glen Head, LI, prosecutors said yesterday, as the glum-looking alleged brawler stood before a criminal court judge in a gray business suit. Drowica, a director at Knight Capital, is charged with harassment and misdemeanor assault — which carries up to one year jail — for allegedly punching another man in the club’s Tap Room with enough force to fracture his eye socket. Drowica then joined with fellow North Shore resident clubgoers Peter Doran and Matthew O’Grady in allegedly beating the heck out of a second man during the April 13 free-for-all.

Manhattan DA not pulling any punches in charging broker in NYAC brawl [NYP]

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Members Of Insider Trading "Club" Were Good At Obtaining Material Non-Public Information, Not So Good At Playing It Cool On Conversations Recorded By The Feds

Later this week, Anthony Chiasson, a Level Global co-founder, and Todd Newman, a former Diamondback portfolio manager, will go to trial in Federal Court for allegedly making $67 million in ill-gotten gains, based on inside information they obtained about Nvidia Corp and Dell Inc. According to U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara, Chiasson and Newman, who've both pleaded not guilty, were able to rack up all their profits by teaming up with a bunch of friends and forming an insider trading club, which is a lot like a book club or fight club in that they took roll, traded canapé duties, and drank Pinot Grigio, but different in that instead of discussing The Art Of Fielding or punching each other in the face, they spent every Monday night from 7 to 9 sharing material non-public information with each other. “This case describes a tight-knit circle of greed on the part of professionals willing to traffic in confidential information,” Bharara said when the charges were announced in January. “It was a circle of friends who essentially formed a criminal club, whose purpose was profit and whose members regularly bartered inside information.” In the beginning, when the club was first formed, there was a spirit of camaraderie, as the club members happily traded tips for everyone's mutual benefit. Unfortunately, things started to break down when some people agreed to cooperate with the government by recording their friends admitting wrongdoing, in exchange for leniency. Former Diamondback analyst Jesse Tortora, for instance, gave fellow club member Danny Kuo a call at the direction of the FBI on December 1, 2010, a conversation that Chiasson and Newman's lawyers are trying to use as evidence that Tortora, who will be testifying against them, lacks credibility, based on the fact that when asked by Kuo if his phone was being tapped, Tortora didn't say "Yup! Helping the Feds build a case against you, actually." “What’s happening, man?” Tortora asked during the call, according to a transcript prosecutors submitted to the court. “Dude, is your phone tapped?” Kuo replied. “Wait, is the phone tapped?” Tortora asked, adding, “Why do you ask that?” Despite losing major points for repeating the question-- you never repeat the question!-- and the extremely unconvincing "Oh, why do you ask" attempt to act natural and not like he was working for the government, Tortora ultimately recovered. After Kuo and Tortora discussed defense strategy to explain their trades were made after legitimate research, Kuo concluded the call with a final warning to Tortora about making future calls from a personal telephone, according to the transcript. “I would seriously invest in some quarters, and start calling from 7-Elevens,” Kuo said. Hedge Fund Founder Faces Jury as FBI Raids Yield Trial [Bloomberg]

"Let The Wives And Children Of These Drunkards Be Confronted With, And Shamed By, The Grotesque Conduct Of Their Husbands And Fathers"

Last month, a fight broke out at the New York Athletic Club that a witness described as a “nondiscriminatory ragematch” involving “young people, old people, girls, members, and nonmembers,” which started as a tiff over a woman and “escalated into a brawl involving three fighting wolfpacks,” wherein “tables were overturned or moved to the room’s periphery to crate a lion’s pit for the battle,” a “fat pudgy kid came out of nowhere, laid out a larger man with a blow to the head and was tackled by a crowd,” approximately two noses were broken, and the police made three arrests. The club's President was pretty, pretty embarrassed by the whole thing, as indicated in a letter to members in which he wrote, "I cannot state forcefully enough how abhorrent this even is to me...It is the responsibility of each and every member to protect and embellish the standing of the N.Y.A.C." And while Manhattan prosecutors' promise to go afterthe guy responsible for most of the damage ensures the shame NYAC officers are feeling won't die down any time soon, perhaps they can take some small solace in the fact that they were hitting each other only with their hands. [...] Piedmont Driving Club Letter [PDF]

A Wildebeest Leaves New York Traveling North At 10 MPH. A Hyena Leaves Westport Traveling South At 15MPH. At What Time Does The Wildebeest Get Eaten?

As many of you know, Bridgewater Associates is mega-successful, multi-billion dollar hedge fund guided by Principles, a company handbook written by founder and Mentor Ray Dalio, which instructs employees to go on radical truth seeking missions in order to better themselves and in turn the firm. Bridgewater takes the principles very seriously and each member of the staff is given spiral bound copies to read, highlight, and imbue their souls with. While the idea of Truth above all else is the overarching idea, there are literally hundreds of principles (such as 31a. "Ask yourself whether you have earned the right to have an opinion," 130. "...Firing people is not a big deal..." and 184. "Use checklists") which span 123 pages and are broken down into outline form after being explained at length. Though familiarity with them has always been an essential part of the job, there has never been formal test determining that all employees met the required level of efficiency. Until now. Apparently the firm has notified employees that there will be an exam on the material, which has resulted in people carrying around their copies and studying whenever they can, particularly on the bus ride from Manhattan to Wesport and back. No date has been announced but it will be administered online à la one of those mandatory HR quizzes that won't let you skip forward. According to proctors, Bridgewater simply wants to use the test as an opportunity to asses what people know, how they're interpreting the principles, and what requires further elucidation. It's unclear what the penalty for failing will be but remedial Principles classes seem obvious. Because we would hate to see any of you have to stay after school, we've highlighted what is most likely to be covered-- feel free to print these out and add to your study guide. ********************************************* ********************************************* ********************************************* ********************************************* ********************************************* ********************************************* ********************************************* Principles [Bridgewater]   essential     (which expects the staff to “probe” each other regularly, no matter one’s rank, in order to foster openness and meritocracy).

Lloyd Blankfein Finally Gets To Be The Prettiest Girl At The Ball

Time was, Jamie Dimon was the most popular CEO on Wall Street and America's "Least Hated Banker," for reasons that included the fact that the man has soulful blue eyes, charisma out the ass, and was in charge of one of the banks that a) didn't go out of business during the financial crisis, like Lehman and Bear and b) supposedly didn't actually need the bailout money the government made it take (as JD has said previously), like Bank of America and Citigroup. The man, in the hearts of many and especially the adoring press, could do no wrong. Which is why it probably stung a lot that Lloyd Blankfein, a Wall Street CEO who also possesses more charm than a person would know what do do with, who was also in charge of a bank that neither went out of business during the financial crisis nor required the bailout money it was forced to take (according to GS), and who is also the owner of a pair of baby blues, though in his case ones that sparkle, could only do wrong. And while LB is not one to gloat at another's misfortune, especially that of a friend, he's obviously feeling pretty good about being living proof of the old saying, "only one Wall Street CEO's balls can be in a vise at a time," and right now it's JD's turn. Dimon did not attend the annual Robin Hood Foundation party [last night], but Blankfein was there, enjoying a rare night out of the spotlight. He shook hands, introduced his wife and, grinning broadly, posed for pictures. For months, Goldman Sachs has been portrayed as the callous Wall Street behemoth whose executives collected giant bonuses while America's housing crisis worsened and unemployment rose. But Monday night was different. "No one cares about Lloyd tonight. It is Jamie against the world, and that's got to feel good for Lloyd," another hedge fund manager said. And this is just the beginning. First, they stop calling you Satan and claiming you poisoned their food, next glowing profiles and cover stories devoting major column inches to your rippling biceps and the throngs of women you beat off with a stick. Dimon Pushes Blankfein Off Hot Seat At Charity Gala [Reuters] Robin Hood Scene: Blankfein, Soros, Rihanna [Bloomberg/Photo]